Multi-Lingual People Explain Which Words From Their Native Language Don't Translate Into English
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Language is a beautiful, fascinating, and most tricky thing.

And each language has its quirks, often finding ways to express feelings and events in ways that other languages cannot.

After Redditor oskskioskski asked the online community, "What are some words that only exist in your language but does not exist in English?" many people from around the world decided to show us a thing or two.


"It has no direct translation..."

The word "kilig" in Filipino. It has no direct translation in the English language but the closest is "the feeling of getting butterflies in your stomach."

phauuyap

"...is the Japanese word for..."

Giphy

Tsundoku is the Japanese word for books you have bought but have just let pile up unread.

ReignofWinter

"The word..."

The word 'hiraeth' in Welsh.

Hiraeth is hard to translate, but it means a deep kind of homesickness or longing.

limegreenbunny

"It means..."

Kalsarikännit in Finnish. It means when you're drinking alcohol at your home wearing only underwear with no intention to go anywhere.

mikkomikomikko

"A feeling of pleasure..."

Schadenfreude - from google: A feeling of pleasure or satisfaction when something bad happens to someone else.

Fremdscham: Embarrassment you feel through the cringy or humilating actions of someone else.

overbread

"It can mean anything..."

The word "lekker" in Afrikaans.

It can mean anything from pleasant to tasty to good to pleasurable. It can be used in relation to food, feelings, interjectory, as a pronoun or adjective.

There is no specific translation for "lekker", so you would need to choose a different word for it in English every time, depending on context.

ThePatrician007

"It's a feeling in your throat..."

"Empalagoso" in Spanish. It's a feeling in your throat when you eat too much sweet creamy stuff. It can also mean when someone is excessively sweet towards you.

Giger-lago

"It's a Dutch word..."

'Gezelligheid,' it's a Dutch word which indicates that you and the people you are with are having a good time.

bschoone

"The German word..."

The German word "Backpfeifengesicht" is more or less translated as "A face in desperate need of a slap."

maleorderbride

"In Portuguese..."

In Portuguese there are two translations for "to be".

One is "ser" which is to be in a more permanent way, usually used to refer to your nationality, a job, or a personal trait, e.g. "Eu sou brasileiro" ("I am Brazilian"), "Ela é uma médica" ("She is a doctor"), or "Ele é um cara legal" ("He is a nice guy").

The other one is "estar", which is to be temporarily, usually used to refer to emotions, current location, or an action (present continuous), e.g. "Eu estou nervoso" ("I am nervous"), "Ela está na estação de trem" ("She is at the train station"), or "Ele está dormindo" ("He is sleeping").

The same applies for Spanish, with the same verbs too.

radioactivecafe

People Explain Which Lessons Aren't Taught In History Class But Should Be
Photo by Taylor Wilcox on Unsplash

It's highly believed that it is important to learn history as a means to improve our future.

What is often overlooked is that what is taught in history class is going to be very different depending on where you went to school.

And this isn't just internationally, even different regions of the United states will likely have very different lessons on American history.

This frequently results in our learning fascinating, heartbreaking and horrifying historical facts which our middle or high school history teachers neglected to teach us.

Redditor Acherontia_atropos91 was curious to learn things people either wished they had learned, or believe they should have learned, in their school history class, leading them to ask:

What isn’t taught in history class but should be?
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People Share The Most Random Things They Miss About Life Before The Pandemic
Photo by Noah on Unsplash

So apparently we are in the endemic phase of this nonsense.

We have light at the end of the tunnel.

So what now?

Where do we go from here?

Normal seems like an outdated word.

How do we get back to normal though?

Is it even possible?

What are reaching back to?

Life pre-Covid.

Those were the days.

If only we could bring them back.

Redditor hetravelingsong wanted to discuss our new normal in this hopeful "endemic" phase. So they asked:

"What’s something random you miss about pre-COVID times?"
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Atheists Break Down What They Actually Do Believe In
Photo by Aaron Burden on Unsplash

What do you believe?

Is there a GOD in the sky?

Is he guiding us and helping us?

Life is really hard. Why is that is a big entity is up there loving us?

Atheists have taken a lot of heat for what feels like shunning GOD.

What if they've been right all along?

Maybe let's take a listen and see what they really think.

Redditor __Jacob______ wanted to hear from the people who don't really believe all that "God" stuff. They asked:

"Atheists, what do you believe in?"
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The list of what irritates me is endless.

I mean... breathing too loud or dust can set me off.

I'm a bit unstable, yes.

But I'm not alone.

So let's discuss.

Redditor Aburntbagel6 wanted to hear about all the times many of us just couldn't control our disdain. They asked:

"What never fails to piss you off?"
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