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Ariana Grande is one of—if not the—biggest pop stars in the world.

It was only a matter of time before she got a wax copycat.


Madame Tussauds in London has revealed its newest addition to their museum. Their statue of Grande is a little, uh, divisive to say the least.

However, in my opinion, it's a lot closer than some of their other attempts.

However, you can definitely tell it's somewhat off. The nose isn't quite right.

Lips aren't all there. It has all the hallmarks of a wax statue.

This did not sit right with fans of the pop star. Twitter was flooded with messages of people who had to let the world know that this wax statue did not look like their Ari.

Which, in fairness to them, why do we keep letting these wax museums get away with sub-par doppelgangers?




Ariana has been on a rollercoaster of a year. Her album Thank U, Next debuted as an absolute powerhouse, with 11 songs breaking into the top 40 of the Billboard Hot 100.

She's also been very open with her own struggles with mental health, at one point, quoting actor Jim Carrey. Carrey returned the kindness with his own message of support.

But what does Ari herself think about the statue?

I'm sure many of us would "just wanna talk" too.


Sometimes you get some really bad wax figures. It just happens.

Sometimes you get Ed Sheeran's statue, which lends credence to my theory that Sheeran is, in fact, a wax statue brought to life by a curse.

It's all in the luck of the draw. This hasn't stopped people from trying to figure out why Grande's statue looks the way it does.

The most common explanation was "Emery Bingham."




We really shouldn't have been surprised at the London location's attempt at a wax figure of Ariana Grande. In 2017, the Las Vegas location unveiled their version of the singer and it was received just as poorly.

At the very least we can say it looks like the new figure is an improvement over the older one.

If you want to see it, the new statue is on display at the Madame Tussaud's in London for five weeks. I'm sure you'll be booking your ticket first chance you get.

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