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Thrift stores abound with killer clothes that only exist in that one place, a strange amount of used electronics, and extremely cheap ways to outfit your entire kitchen with silverware, mugs, pots, and pans.

But the whole time you're there you feel a keen sense that most of the items around you have been neglected in an attic for the last two decades and dusted off very recently.

Usually, that's no big deal. But sometimes things that old and given away are given away for a reason.

u/NormalBlogTM asked, "Charity shop volunteers of Reddit, what's the worst/saddest thing your shop has been donated?"


Discount Haunting

A local woman with young kids died of cancer, so her husband donated all her clothes to the shop. The shop then did the worst thing it could, and dressed all the mannequins in the window in her clothes. Her kids had to walk past the shop displaying their dead Mum's clothes to get to school every day.

u/pickleforpresident

Not the Intended Recipient

A teddy bear with a pre-recorded message telling someone that they love them and hope they get better.

u/Octolingfighter

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When an Object is a Portal 

An elderly man came in one day and donated his and his wife's wedding rings. He told me he had worn her ring on a chain around his neck since she died nearly 20 years earlier. They had no children and he didn't date again. He had finally decided to donate their rings because he had been diagnosed with terminal cancer a few days before. Safe to say, I had to take my lunch break early and have a cry in the staff kitchen.

u/wickedturban

Not a Ton of Resale Value

The thing that stuck out the most to me was a set of Crocheted woman's underwear

u/postedByDan

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Not Joking, An Absolute Tragedy

the shop I used to volunteer in got a dead cat in one of the bags once. They figured it must have climbed into one of the big donation bins for clothes and not been able to get out

u/pikapika350

Someone is Out Here Lying About Medals They Never Earned

I found a set of military medals from the second world war in one of our local charity shops before.

Bought them and spent a considerable amount of time trying to find the owner or their relatives to return them but so far no luck.

u/OperationIntegrityIntegrity

Haste Makes Waste

At one point, my mom asked my dad to drop a garage bag of old clothes off at Goodwill. So he grabbed a bag and off he went. When he got there, he realized that he had actually brought a dead raccoon that she had put in a separate bag for some reason.

u/cb789cb

A True Antique

One day while sorting through donations, she came across a slim leather case, which she described as "very handsome." She thought perhaps it contained valuable jewelry or maybe a collector's knife. Opening it revealed an odd contraption made of rubber tubing and metal valves. Perplexed, she took it to her supervisor, who happened to be a Catholic nun.

Turns out it was a 1930s penis inflation device designed for "marital difficulties and impotency." My friend said they got a hefty price for it on eBay.

u/SuzQP

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Hope They’re Never Needed Again

Walkers for small children, and small wheelchairs

u/EmbarrassedSoup7

No Respect

I donated all my fat clothes including a shirt I loved and had for many years. My clothes went like hot cakes which was bittersweet except for my favorite shirt which nobody appeared to want. Finally a guy took it and was using it as his rag to wipe his hands and nose while he ate. That pulled a few heart strings.

u/Vealophile

Image by Mary Pahlke from Pixabay

There are few things more satisfying than a crisp $20 bill. Well, maybe a crisp $100 bill.

But twenty big ones can get you pretty far nonetheless.

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Image by Jan Vašek from Pixabay

I realize that school safety has been severely compromised and has been under dire scrutiny over the past decade and of course, it should be. And when I was a student, my safety was one of my greatest priorities but, some implemented rules under the guise of "safety" were and are... just plain ludicrous. Like who thinks up some of these ideas?

Redditor u/Animeking1108 wanted to discuss how the education system has ideas that sometimes are just more a pain in the butt than a daily enhancement... What was the dumbest rule your school enforced?
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One of the golden rules of life? Doctors are merely human. They don't know everything and they make mistakes. That is why you always want to get another opinion. Things are constantly missed. That doesn't mean docs don't know what they're doing, they just aren't infallible. So make sure to ask questions, lots of them.

Redditor u/Gorgon_the_Dragon wanted to hear from doctors about why it is imperative we always get second and maybe third opinions by asking... Doctors of Reddit, what was the worse thing you've seen for a patient that another Doctor overlooked?
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When we think about learning history, our first thought is usually sitting in our high school history class (or AP World History class if you're a nerd like me) being bored out of our minds. Unless again, you're a huge freaking nerd like me. But I think we all have the memory of the moment where we realized learning about history was kinda cool. And they usually start from one weird fact.

Here are a few examples of turning points in learning about history, straight from the keyboards of the people at AskReddit.

U/Tynoa2 asked: What's your favourite historical fact?


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