Rev. Susan Spicer has an amazing message for those who stolen a valuable item from her home recently. Thanks to Kawartha Lakes for publishing the original.

An open letter to the thieves who entered my house on May 2 at about 1 a.m.:

It must have startled you when you slid open my patio door and the cat sprang up from the couch. I heard her nails clattering across the hardwood floor; its what woke me up, that and the sound of the door closing again. At first I thought I was dreaming, and when I had gathered my wits enough to venture downstairs I didnt notice that anything was missing.

At that point you were long gone.

The next day I noticed my big black bag missing from the chair in the dining room.

Heres what I am missing: not the $10 or so you might have found in there. You have my daytimer. It will take me a few hours of work to reconstruct my calendar over the next several months, along with the notes about visits I need to make to people, phone calls to be returned, arrangements to be made for weddings and funerals.


Continue to the next page for the rest of this letter.

You have my prayer book. It is green, leather-bound, a fine edition of the Book of Alternative Services of the Anglican Church of Canada, inscribed by my friend and mentor, Gordon+, on the occasion of my ordination.

You have files and notes pertaining to my work. And you have my notebook with sermon notes, meeting notes, personal notes, my memory and reflections over the last several weeks. I am really missing that.

You have two books I had purchased that day at the Royal Ontario Museum of indigenous stories to be used in our summer camp program for children.

As you have gone through my stuff you have probably figured out that I am a priest, an Anglican priest, and the stuff you have, including that big old black bag, isnt really useful to you, but it is precious and essential to me for all kinds of reasons.

I have a proposal for you: if you need something, money, food, help, anything at all, please come and knock on my door and I will give you whatever you ask for.


Continue to the last page to see how this letter to thieves ends...

That is one of the rules I live by. I do that because I long for the day when we will live in a world where thieves will no longer break-in and steal.

Until that day, my doors will be locked and my sleep will be slightly less peaceful than it used to be in this beautiful place where I have made my home.

I invite you to come and bring back my stuff. Forgiveness is guaranteed; confession is optional. Friendship is possible.

It would just make both our lives so much easier.

In hope,

the Rev. Susan Spicer

Priest of the Parish of Fenelon Falls and Coboconk

What do you think of her wager with the thieves?

Spread the word, so hopefully Rev. Spicer can find possible friends!

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