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I used to work at a bookstore and I remember when organizing consultant Marie Kondo's The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up was released. The hullaballoo over her book was unprecedented and for weeks there wasn't a single hour when I wasn't stopped by several customers eager to get their hands on the book––and Kondo's infinite wisdom.


Kondo's Netflix show, Tidying Up, is a hit, too, and its success has had an unexpected side effect: People have taken it upon themselves to live by Kondo's golden rule ("Does it spark joy?") to get organized. Even better, they are donating their unwanted items to libraries, used bookstores, thrift shops, and local Goodwill outlets.

The New Yorker observed of the phenomenon:

The show is "Tidying Up with Marie Kondo," the new reality series from the famed Japanese organizational expert, which was released on Netflix on New Year's Day. A kindly sprite in ballet flats and boxy cardigans, Kondo flutters through the homes of harried Angelenos and, with the help of a translator, advises them on how to declutter. Like a "Great British Bake Off" episode that inspires viewers to attempt their own pavlova, "Tidying Up" has emboldened its audience members to clean. On social media last weekend, visitors to libraries, Goodwill stores, and consignment shops across the country noted a surge in donations that seemed to exceed the usual New Year bump.

Here's one library:

And a used bookstore:


And a shop supporting victims of domestic violence:

Here's a consignment shop in Melbourne:

And an organization which supports children, adults, and families for mental health:

People are riding the show's wave of popularity and are loving how free they feel without being bogged down by all of their excessive stuff:




It's safe to say this show is a rousing success. It looks like The Great British Bake Off has some stiff competition for the best feel-good show on Netflix.

Now, if you'll excuse me, I'm off to clean my apartment. And if you're looking for some tools to help get organized that I've been using, check out this awesome list here.

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Conspiracy theories are beliefs that there are covert powers that be changing the course of history for their own benefits. It's how we see the rise of QAnon conspiracies and people storming the capital.

Why do people fall for them? Well some research has looked into the reasons for that.

The Association for Psychological Science published a paper that reviewed some of the research:

"This research suggests that people may be drawn to conspiracy theories when—compared with nonconspiracy explanations—they promise to satisfy important social psychological motives that can be characterized as epistemic (e.g., the desire for understanding, accuracy, and subjective certainty), existential (e.g., the desire for control and security), and social (e.g., the desire to maintain a positive image of the self or group)."

Whatever the motivations may be, we wanted to know which convoluted stories became apart of peoples consciousness enough for them to believe it.

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Image by Enrique Meseguer from Pixabay

I hate ghosts, even if it's Casper. My life is already stressful enough. I don't need to creeped out by spirits from the beyond. Shouldn't they be resting and basking in the glow of the great beyond instead of menacing the rest of us?

The paranormal seems to be consistently in unrest, which sounds like death isn't any more fun or tranquil than life. So much for something to look forward to.

Some ghosts just like to scare it up. It's not always like "Ghosthunters" the show.

Redditor u/Murky-Increase4705 wanted to hear about all the times we've faced some hauntings that left us shook, by asking:

Reddit, what are your creepy encounters with something that you are convinced was paranormal?
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Image by Denise Husted from Pixabay

The past year brought about much anxiety and it's been a challenge to find the light in what has felt like perpetual darkness.

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Image by Gabriela Sanda from Pixabay

A lot of talk going on about women's bodies, isn't there?

Not necessarily with women front and center as part of the conversation, unfortunately.

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