This Unintended Side Effect Of 'Tidying Up With Marie Kondo' Has Us Smiling
Gary Gershoff/WireImage

I used to work at a bookstore and I remember when organizing consultant Marie Kondo's The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up was released. The hullaballoo over her book was unprecedented and for weeks there wasn't a single hour when I wasn't stopped by several customers eager to get their hands on the book––and Kondo's infinite wisdom.


Kondo's Netflix show, Tidying Up, is a hit, too, and its success has had an unexpected side effect: People have taken it upon themselves to live by Kondo's golden rule ("Does it spark joy?") to get organized. Even better, they are donating their unwanted items to libraries, used bookstores, thrift shops, and local Goodwill outlets.

The New Yorkerobserved of the phenomenon:

The show is "Tidying Up with Marie Kondo," the new reality series from the famed Japanese organizational expert, which was released on Netflix on New Year's Day. A kindly sprite in ballet flats and boxy cardigans, Kondo flutters through the homes of harried Angelenos and, with the help of a translator, advises them on how to declutter. Like a "Great British Bake Off" episode that inspires viewers to attempt their own pavlova, "Tidying Up" has emboldened its audience members to clean. On social media last weekend, visitors to libraries, Goodwill stores, and consignment shops across the country noted a surge in donations that seemed to exceed the usual New Year bump.

Here's one library:

And a used bookstore:


And a shop supporting victims of domestic violence:

Here's a consignment shop in Melbourne:

And an organization which supports children, adults, and families for mental health:

People are riding the show's wave of popularity and are loving how free they feel without being bogged down by all of their excessive stuff:




It's safe to say this show is a rousing success. It looks like The Great British Bake Off has some stiff competition for the best feel-good show on Netflix.

Now, if you'll excuse me, I'm off to clean my apartment. And if you're looking for some tools to help get organized that I've been using, check out this awesome list here.

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