JOIN
OUR EMAIL LIST!
Rachel Uretsky-Pratt/Facebook

Elementary school teacher Rachel Uretsky-Pratt shared a photo of a gift she received from one of her students—Lucky Charms marshmallows—and instantly captured the hearts of not just her community, but the internet at large.

"Today was the last day before our winter break," she wrote. "We will have two weeks off to rest with our families and loved ones over the holidays then head back to school in 2019."

Uretsky-Pratt noted that the holiday season prompts many teachers to "bring their kiddos something such as books or little treats and occasionally in return receive something from their students."

Uretsky-Pratt herself received chocolates, notes, and jewelry from her students, but the bag of Lucky Charms marshmallows, she says, "stood out to me the most."

She added:

"You see, 100% of my school is on free/reduced lunch. They also get free breakfast at school every day of the school week. This kiddo wanted to get my something so badly, but had nothing to give.So rather than give me nothing, this student opened up her free breakfast cereal this morning, took the packaging of her spork, straw, and napkin, and finally took the time to take every marshmallow out of her cereal to put in a bag—for me. Be grateful for what you have, and what others give you. It all truly comes from the deepest parts of their hearts."


Hearts grew several sizes that day, with many expressing sheer joy at the child's generosity.


Facebook


Facebook


Facebook


Facebook


Facebook

One teacher even shared a story of her own:

Facebook

More than 13 million children in the United States live in "food insecure" homes, according to hunger relief organization No Kid Hungry. The organization also reports that:

  • 1 in 6 children in the United States face hunger.
  • Over 40 million people lived in poverty in 2016. 13 million were children.
  • 59 percent of food-insecure households reported that they take advantage of federal nutrition programs like SNAP and WIC.
  • 20 million children in the United States rely on SNAP benefits.
  • The USDA reports that 45 million Americans rely on SNAP benefits to buy food each month; two-thirds of these benefits go to households with children.
  • WIC, on top of serving 53 percent of infants in the United States, was a boon for 7.7 million mothers and children who relied on WIC benefits to buy food in 2016.
  • 56 percent of children in each state ate breakfast at school in 2016.
  • 5 out of 6 kids who rely on free or reduced-price school meals aren't getting free meals in the summer.

A little perspective, indeed.

Clint Patterson/Unsplash

Conspiracy theories are beliefs that there are covert powers that be changing the course of history for their own benefits. It's how we see the rise of QAnon conspiracies and people storming the capital.

Why do people fall for them? Well some research has looked into the reasons for that.

The Association for Psychological Science published a paper that reviewed some of the research:

"This research suggests that people may be drawn to conspiracy theories when—compared with nonconspiracy explanations—they promise to satisfy important social psychological motives that can be characterized as epistemic (e.g., the desire for understanding, accuracy, and subjective certainty), existential (e.g., the desire for control and security), and social (e.g., the desire to maintain a positive image of the self or group)."

Whatever the motivations may be, we wanted to know which convoluted stories became apart of peoples consciousness enough for them to believe it.

Keep reading... Show less
Image by Enrique Meseguer from Pixabay

I hate ghosts, even if it's Casper. My life is already stressful enough. I don't need to creeped out by spirits from the beyond. Shouldn't they be resting and basking in the glow of the great beyond instead of menacing the rest of us?

The paranormal seems to be consistently in unrest, which sounds like death isn't any more fun or tranquil than life. So much for something to look forward to.

Some ghosts just like to scare it up. It's not always like "Ghosthunters" the show.

Redditor u/Murky-Increase4705 wanted to hear about all the times we've faced some hauntings that left us shook, by asking:

Reddit, what are your creepy encounters with something that you are convinced was paranormal?
Keep reading... Show less
Image by Denise Husted from Pixabay

The past year brought about much anxiety and it's been a challenge to find the light in what has felt like perpetual darkness.

Keep reading... Show less
Image by Gabriela Sanda from Pixabay

A lot of talk going on about women's bodies, isn't there?

Not necessarily with women front and center as part of the conversation, unfortunately.

Keep reading... Show less