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Third graders Jackson Garrett and Mark White are best friends, so when Jackson realized his friend needed help he didn't think twice about stepping up. Now others are taking a lesson from the pair after hearing their heart warming story of friendship and generosity.



It started one day when Jackson noticed Mark was not wearing any socks. On another day Mark barely had anything for lunch. Mark told Jackson it was because his parents did not have much money.

This prompted Jackson to go home and grabbed $32 of his own birthday money to give to his friend.





Mark was floored by his friend's generosity, but his parents were a bit confused when he brought the money home.

"I showed up at home and said, 'Let's go buy some food,' and my parents didn't know what I was talking about. I told them my best friend Jackson gave me the money."

After checking with Clifdale Principal Windy Hodge, Mark's parents used some of the money to buy him 14 Lunchables and a thank you card for Jackson.



But Mark and his parents were not the only ones blown away by Jackson's generosity.

"I was overwhelmed by the amount of kindness showed by Jackson," said Principal Hodge. "Their strong friendship allowed him to see a need for his friend and do something completely on his own. He saw a need and wanted to meet it. What he did was incredibly inspiring."

Jackson's mom Kristen Garrett was also proud of her son after hearing what he had done:

"I was very surprised and very pleased he did that. I am proud he stepped up when he realized his friend needed help."

The boys' teacher, Malinda Bridges, found out what happened when Mark brought in the card for Jackson:

"I saw Mark come around that afternoon, and he had brought a card for Jackson and I was wondering what that was about. There was a thank-you note in the card and it said, 'Here's a big hug.' The note was from Mark's parents to Jackson's parents. It was something special, for him to think about Mark and give up his birthday money. That is huge."









And now that the boys' story is being shared, many others have been touched by it.








The heart warming story of friendship and generosity is something we could all learn from.






Though people wondered about what was next for Mark.





Thankfully the amazing story had an even happier ending. After hearing their story, Jackson's grandfather Ronnie Emory decided to follow his grandson's example.

Every holiday season Emory's company Quad Packaging sponsors a child; this year they chose Mark, and will now help pay for his school lunches!

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