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I guess cows need love too?

A new app specifically marketing itself as "Tinder for cows" has been released. It's called Tudder and it's more useful than you might think.


Tudder provides a similar interface as Tinder, giving pictures and a little more information about the cows on the platform. All you have to do is swipe and hope for a match!

…This is a joke, right?





While, no, the cows aren't going on dates, this app is very useful to find proper breeding matches for the animals.

The app allows farmers to sift through cattle, swiping left and right on different cattle. If they find a match, they are taken to the UK website SellMyLivestock to get more information about the animal before purchase.

Doug Bairner, the CEO of UK-based Hectare Agritech, felt the idea made sense.

"Matching livestock online is even easier than it is to match humans because there's a huge amount of data that sits behind these wonderful animals that predicts what their offspring will be."

Among the data farmers can use when trying to find a date for their stallion of a bull is milk yield, protein content, and even calving potential.

Much of the information is taken directly from SellMyLivestock, and this app dropped just in time for Valentine's Day, so one can assume it's just a bit of fun.

The fact the app also carries a disclaimer saying, "This is meant to be a bit of fun," also supports this idea.






A genuine Tudder user, cattle farmer James Bridger, believes the app is useful.

"You've got all this data of its background and everything which if you're at a market you might not have had the time to go through for every single random animal."

The app also means you don't have to transport the animal back and forth for potential buyers to be able to see it.

"There's nothing better than seeing an animal in its home, its natural habitat, rather than putting it on a lorry.
"If someone rings up and wants to come and have a look, or even getting it from the picture, it's ideal really from that respect and they're happier for it."

Doug Bairner believes his app has other potential with other animals.

"Sheep breeding is similarly data driven, so maybe 'ewe-Harmony' should be next."

Not bad, but maybe the internet can do a better job of finding the next great dating app.






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