Every week, Jimmy Fallon tweets a prompt for The Tonight Show's hashtag game, where the funniest responses to #MomTexts, #MyFamilyIsWeird, #WhyDidISayThat, or other relatable hashtags are collected and read by Fallon on the air. Most responses stay pretty on point. When Fallon sent out this week's prompt, however, he wasn't expecting the incredibly dedicated fanbase of the recently cancelled Freeform show Shadowhunters to step in and hijack it.


This week's prompt was #IfIWonTheLottery, and you can guess what Shadowhunters fans would do with that money.










If this is the first time you've heard of Shadowhunters, which was cancelled in June after completing its third season, you're in good company. The show, based on The Mortal Instruments series of books by Cassandra Clare, Shadowhunters "told the story of Clary Fray, a young woman who finds out on her 18th birthday that she's a Shadowhunter ― a human-angel hybrid who feels compelled to...hunt demons." Freeform has plans to air a conclusion to the series in early 2019, but that's not enough for many fans, who feel the series (whose finale was watched live by about 310,000 people) deserves to continue.

They're making their feelings VERY clear to Jimmy Fallon:


This is the most coordinated Twitter effort from Shadowhunters fans to date, though they've tweeted at Fallon in the past, calling for the show's renewal. In the non-digital world, fans have also taken steps some would call overzealous, including "starting a Change.org petition, renting billboards in Times Square and even reportedly hiring a plane to circle Netflix's LA headquarters with a pro-Shadowhunters banner."


















Here's to you, Shadowhunters fans! Tweeting at Jimmy Fallon may not have any effect on whether your show gets brought back, but it's certainly put Shadowhunters on the public's radar. If only this many people knew about it back when it was still on the air...

H/T - Huffpost, TVTattle

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash

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