JOIN
OUR EMAIL LIST!

Feeling pretty down on yourself lately? It may be a matter of age. New research released in the American Psychological Association's "Psychological Bulletin" shows that the average person feels best about themselves when they're in their 60s.

The data was pulled from studies of over 164,000 participants and showed that, while self-esteem can fluctuate throughout a person's life, the average person goes through a patterned increase.

Using that data, a meta-analysis of 331 samples of people ranging from four to 94 years old supported the theory that self-esteem increases until age 60. From 70 to 90, there is a slight drop with a more significant one hitting at around 94 years old.

This new information goes against the common notion that an individual's youth or job success would largely contribute to their self-esteem. While that's not the case, authors Ulrich Orth, Ruth Yasemin Erol, and Eva C. Luciano from the University of Bern declare that "self-esteem truly matters for people's lives."

The authors write that "the findings suggest that, on average, self-esteem increases in early and middle childhood, remains constant in adolescence, increases strongly in young adulthood, continues to increase in middle adulthood, peaks between age 60 and 70 years, and declines in old age and more strongly in very old age."

Why do the 60s seem to be the golden age when it comes to career, income, and social status? "During middle adulthood, most people further invest in their social roles, for example by taking on managerial roles at work, maintaining a satisfying relationship with their spouse or partner and helping their children to become responsible and independent adults," the study's researchers wrote.

The findings may not apply to all people, however. So if you're in your 60s and don't feel like you're at the top of your game, don't feel like you won't peak just because some research said you should have already.

H/T: Inc., APA PsycNET, AARP

Image by Robin Higgins from Pixabay

Hilarious moments are blind to timing. They seem to strike at the absolute worst times, when laughing would be completely inappropriate.

Keep reading... Show less
Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay

Working with dogs is a field like few others. Though a job at a veterinary clinic, animal shelter, or training class may have its moments of tragedy and frustration, the unique hilarity that dogs bring is a real treat.

Keep reading... Show less
Image by Pexels from Pixabay

We're all aware television shows are fake and, heck, even the ones pretending to be real have a certain level of fabrication permeating throughout. That's not why we watch, though, we watch because we want to be invested into believing in a show's characters and their journeys. So when a character is mysteriously removed from a show with zero explanation it can leave a bad taste in our mouths that never goes away.

Keep reading... Show less
Image by Michal Jarmoluk from Pixabay

There's something quite wonderful about finding a loophole and taking advantage of it... especially when you're broke. (Trust me, it could mean the difference between surviving and well, not.)

When I was really poor, for example, I used to go to a Burger King to get cheap burgers with what little money I had. The food was filling and helped tide me over. I eventually found a glitch on the app that allowed me to add two extra burgers to my order. Trust me, it saved me on my worst days. (As you can imagine, I am really sick of fast food now that I'm much more financially stable.)

After Redditor Thym3Travr asked the online community, "What loophole did you exploit mercilessly?" people shared their stories.

Keep reading... Show less