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Protests have swept through Sudan in recent months, with many anti-government protesters demanding the resignation of President Omar al-Bashir, whose loyalist security forces have killed numerous people in the capital, Khartoum.

One image has taken captivated the internet in particular: It's a picture of a young woman in a white robe standing on top of a car. She raises her arms.

The woman, says Hala Al-Karib, a Sudanese women's rights activist with the Strategic Initiative for Women in the Horn of Africa, sums up "this moment we have been waiting for for the past 30 years."

The photo of the woman, which several news outlets have identified as Alaa Salah, a 22-year-old engineering and architecture student, has already struck a powerful chord as the world watches the protests rage on.



The woman led protesters in a chant of "Thowra!" –– Arabic for "revolution."

Hind Makki, an interfaith educator who holds a degree in International Relations who is the founder and curator of "Side Entrance," a crowd-sourced website "that documents women's prayer experiences in mosques around the world," explained what makes the image so powerful.





President Omar Hassan al-Bashir has held power since 1989. The International Criminal Court has had a warrant out for his arrest for many years for directing mass killings, rapes, and pillages in Darfur.

He's been accused of crimes against humanity, genocide, and other war crimes.

Image by Steve Buissinne from Pixabay

Y'all know that one Hannah Montana song? “Everybody makes mistakes! Everybody has those days!" That's the song I sing to myself every time I accidentally burn myself while making ramen. It comforts me to know, however, that there are a lot of worse mistakes out there than some spilled ramen. Who knew?

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Image by Daniel Perrig from Pixabay

When I was younger, it seemed every adult believed that you couldn't swim for several hours after eating. Why did they all believe this? I fought them on this all the time, by the way. I shouldn't have had to, just because I'd eaten some barbecue during a pool party. Guess what, though? That belief is unfounded.

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As much as we're not supposed to feel satisfaction upon observing the struggles of other people, it can be hard to resist a silent, internal fist pump when some blunder occurs immediately after we tried to help the person prevent it.

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Image by leo2014 from Pixabay

One of the most upsetting aspects of the Covid-19 pandemic––which is saying a lot, frankly––is the number of people who have been so affected by misinformation and disinformation. You know the ones to which I refer: These are the people who are convinced the virus is a hoax despite the lives it's claimed and the devastation it has wrought on society at large. Disinformation kills––there are stories of people who remained convinced that Covid-19 is a hoax even while intubated in the ICU, even up to their last breath.

After Redditor asked the online community, "Doctors of Reddit, what happened when you diagnosed a Covid-19 denier with Covid-19?" doctors and other medical professionals shared these rather unsettling stories.

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