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They say one man's trash is another man's treasure, and for those of us who grew up with very little money, we know how true that is.

People throw away things like perfectly good food all the time, or furniture, or clothing. We see these things go to waste with the ultimate face palms, in favor of more luxurious items.

Though what we could consider luxuries, more wealthy parties might just consider them to be normal.


u/SnooBeaz asked:

For those who grew up poor, what did you consider a luxury?

Here were some of those answers.

DIDNEY WORL

Going places during school vacation. The kids would be all like "what!? you've never been to xyz amusement park!?" No, Trisha. My family doesn't even have a car." Which is another luxury to me.

lillithfair4

A Heat Away

Being allowed to turn on the heat during the winter, and also being able to hire a professional to fix broken appliances, plumbing, etc

theabsoluteunit420

I think that's what pushed me to be the jack of all trades type.

If something broke, calling a professional was out of the question. Dad would fix it. Sometimes sh!ttily, but he'd do it.

Definitely those types of experiences that shape you as a person.

SarinationX

Bubbly For Me?

My Mom had 7 children in 10 years, 1950-1960. I remember having a whole bottle (those smallish glass ones that came out of the machine for 10 cents) of soft drink to my self instead of sharing 1 bottle between all 7 of us. I was perhaps 5 years old. I still remember this as the best thing ever.

someonesgoat

Clean And Shiny

Staying at someone's house who wasn't poor, like a relative or friend. Their house was also so clean, beautiful, pictures on the wall, knick knacks on the counter, and carpet you could play on because it was clean.

I spent my entire teenage years hiding where I lived.

smashingpumpkinspice

No More Hand-Me-Downs

New clothes.

I grew up pretty poor (no TV, no toys, but had a Sears catalog). My dad got in a serious accident when I was in 4th grade and almost lost his life. He won a small settlement from the community college he was working at and I was able to buy new clothes for the first time in my life. Before this all I ever had were hand me downs from my cousin and donation clothes from the church. Most were worn to the point of having patches on the knees.

The worst part about getting new clothes for the first time is I felt terrible the whole time picking out new clothes because I always felt like a financial burden to my parents. I remember going to Miller's Outpost and picking out typical 80's clothes (OP, TnC, etc.).

It's funny how growing up poor affects my everyday choices, for better or worse. I'll never outgrow some of the feelings I had as a poor kid and I feel for any kid who has to endure a childhood of poverty. It will affect them and their choices for the rest of their life.

pewpewdeez

Chopped Wood And...Drugs...?

I grew up poor in Arkansas. We didn't have central heat or air so I had to chop firewood for our wood burning stove to stay warm in the winter. We lived way out in the boonies too, so convincing my parents to spend gas to take me to a friends house was really hard.

Rubadubtubgirl

Penny For Your Hot Cross Buns

I don't know if anyone can relate, but in about 3rd maybe 4th grade, me and my twin brother had a music class where we were both required to buy a recorder. (Like a plastic flute thing) well my mom said we didn't have the money so my twin brother and I tore the whole house up in search of $6 for two recorders. We brought a ziploc bag full of change pennies, nickels, dimes etc.

I think the teacher felt sorry for us, cause she paid for our recorders when the rest of the students left the room. Gave us the ziploc bag back.

Thank you Mrs. Albrecht

vvMario

Art Times

In high school, my boyfriend (who became my husband) and his family picked up pretty early on that I was poor, and that my family was pretty dysfunctional. They really let me into their family and took care of me in a sweet, not pity, way.

I was super into art, so his mom found a neighborhood art teacher that did like basically small group art classes and it was so so cool. Anyways she usually charged like $100 for all the supplies, time, etc. My mom knew how excited I was, and I never asked for anything so she told me to ask the teacher to wait until her next paycheck. The teacher was like "sure!" By the time I brought that check to her, I think my boyfriend's mom talked to her, and she ripped it up and said I got a "scholarship" for the class. Honestly it gives me such good vibes thinking about it till this day.

bageltricloud

A Stitch Of Warmth

A new winter coat. I don't remember having a new winter coat until I was probably 14 or 15, they had always been hand-me-downs from my cousins. They were usually at least ten years old by the time I got them and the stuffing would be all clumped up.

stephers85

It's The People Who Laugh Who Don't Deserve Lunch

School parties where everyone brought something to share for lunch.

"If you don't bring something, you don't get to participate..."

I brought two carrots after not being able to afford school lunch for two years. Even the teacher laughed at me. My young self just decided that day that some people don't deserve lunch.

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