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Quitting a job can be a liberating feeling, but it can also be scary as hell... especially if you don't have another job waiting for you on the horizon.

Thanks to Redditor BurningDruid13, we have some answers to the following question: "Have you ever quit a job, without another lined up, for your mental health? How did it turn out?"


"Yes."

Yes. I had a job that I loved. Had coworkers I loved (I'm still friends with some). Ownership changed. My job that was a M-F, 9-5, somehow turned into on call all the time. My workload was always heavy, got added onto. I would say no to additional workload. It somehow still ended up on my plate. Somewhere around a year after the ownership change, I found myself googling heart attack, and mental breakdown symptoms because I knew something wasn't right. I finally walked into work one day and handed in my notice.

No job lined up. Didn't think it through. I wrote up my notice 5min before I left for work that day. Due to bills, I ended up taking a job I was overqualified for, and made crap for pay. But after a few months I got hired to where I am now. I do the same type of job as the one I walked away from. Did it work out for me, I'd like to say yes. But only time will tell. I will say both myself and my family are much happier right now. And I haven't wondered if I'm having a mental breakdown or possible heart attack since I left. That's a win.

working_mommy

"It was great at first."

Giphy

Yes! I quit a very high-paying job, in fact. I was a software engineer.

It was great at first. I liked my coworkers, and the company was one of those startups that had a ping pong table and cold brew coffee on tap and all that jazz. It was my first job out of college and I was dazzled by the cool community feel and all the "amenities."

However, they had no system in place to train me. I was basically expected to just read the codebase and just instantly know exactly what to do. My team leader couldn't answer my questions, and I quickly started drowning in work.

My once-recreational drug use turned habitual. Once I finally started performing well, that only reinforced my terrible habits. I thought that if I stopped "self-medicating", I would fall behind and they would fire me.

I cried every day. I was also the only female employee on the software team, and I got these paranoid thoughts in my head that my male coworkers didn't really like me (in retrospect, I'm sure my alienation was totally my fault and a result of my anxiety). I didn't even like the programming anymore. When I was in college, I interned with people who were using software to help charities, uncover bogus statistics, and generally lift up communities. My job was nothing like that. The people there acted like they were curing cancer, but the majority of what we did boiled down to helping huge companies build training platforms that were more "hip" and "cool."

So I quit. Not just that job, but the whole field. I had started abusing harder as well, and I knew I was going to end up killing myself. I went to rehab, and then I went back to school and got my Master's degree in Education with a focus in mathematics.

I'm a private tutor and a substitute teacher now. I hope to get my PhD one day, but for now I am happy helping young people realize their dreams. I set my own schedule so that I'm able to pursue my passions: volunteering at a children's hospital tutoring sick kids that need to miss school, and helping young women from local battered women's shelters and homeless shelters learn graphic design and programming so that they can have valuable marketable job skills.

I'm two years clean from drugs and I have the most wonderful friends and a purrfect kitty! I am so, so happy I quit my job. Even though people thought I was insane for leaving the tech field (and I'm sure my mom's friends talked trash about me behind her back), I'm glad I didn't pay them any mind.

sugar-magnolias

"Got burnt out..."

Got burnt out and quit after management changes. Luckily I saved up a good amount of money to do whatever I wanted for about 4 months until I finally felt the need to better myself and move on with my life. Got another job that was safer than my last and went back to school to further my degree! It was a much needed break, don't regret it one bit.

Velvetx1

"I quit..."

I quit my job of a year and a half out of anger and spite for my manager, and because of my quickly declining mental health. While it helped at first the anxiety of not having a steady source of income took a much larger toll on me than anticipated and I really didn't get to focus on my recovery/ therapy for my mental health until I had secured a new job to quell my anxieties.

flarvia

"Left my job..."

Giphy

Left my job of 15 years with nothing lined up because it was gaining me nothing any more aside from being overused for my job knowledge with no reward. Took a month off, found another job that pays me more per hour than my last after I got promoted to supervisor after putting in 5 months. Couldn't be happier.

undeleted_error_76

"Yeah, I had been overworked..."

Yeah, I had been overworked and underpaid (and under appreciated) at a small resort for months. Tempers flared and I was given an ultimatum, I chose to walk out the door in the middle of the busy season.

The next night I went to a bar and saw another resort owner (and friend) saying goodbye to his only employee (he typically had 2-3). I walked up after and the conversation went like this:

Me: that sucks, do you have anything else lined up?

Him: nope, I've got nothing

Me: do you need somebody to help?

Him: do you need a job?

Me: yup, as of yesterday.

Him: show up tomorrow whenever you want and you've got the job.

The rest of the summer I ran his cafe/ shop (I had 7 years of cooking and 2 years retail management experience) and he ran the outfitter.

The first day after showing me around the kitchen he had to go attend to something, when he came back I had 20 people already eating and I was chatting them up and cleaning. He looked around and goes "well, you're getting a raise." The rest of the summer was great.

ThaBFGisMe

"I got bored..."

I got bored of my life in the UK and sick of my job. So I quit and got a one-way ticket to Australia to start a new life.

apeliott

"Quit my job..."

Quit my job at a call centre without anything lined up. I used to cry in my car before a shift, used up all my sick days, and it worsened my suicidal thoughts so I got myself out of there when I couldn't take it anymore. I quietly stood up from my desk and quit on the spot. I had never walked out on a job before.

Took me a month to find another job with just slightly less hours (so a little less money) but it was worth it because I'm a lot better mentally and physically, and I like the job. Sometimes you just gotta do what you gotta do.

damerror

"Worked..."

Worked a call center job after one week of training and two days of actual work.

During the training you're shown how it's not possible to order a free trial of these expensive products without seeing the clearly marked (in multiple locations) terms and conditions.

But then I got to the floor and these people were old people who were offered a free gift when they bought something on amazon. They never went to a website and ordered a free trial. They were lied to and then charged $80+ three weeks later.

It was a scam built to prey on old people.

I had a panic attack on the way to work and quit when I arrived.

SuddenTerrible_Haiku

"Hell yes."

Hell yes. I worked in a retail store that was farming-based, but had the political atmosphere of Game of Thrones. Everyone hated each other and constantly tried to undermine one another. If you were talking to someone that someone else didn't like, it was known across the store, and suddenly, people would stop talking to you. As in, you would stand there and ask a question, and they would turn their back on you.

I got zero training, got promoted to "zone manager," (more work with no extra pay), and then injured my foot falling off of one of their rickety wooden ladders.

This caused everyone to turn on me because the store had to file a workman's comp claim, so they missed out on the annual reward: a visit to the Golden Corral buffet in January.

Anyway, after about two weeks of mind-numbing boredom and having everyone staring daggers at me while I tried to figure out what the hell I was supposed to be doing, I just quit. Didn't give notice. Just left my badge and vest there and went to lunch and never came back.

It took me a few months to find another job, but at least I was no longer alternating between openly weeping and feeling physically nauseous.

MagicJasoni

Image by Mary Pahlke from Pixabay

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