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People are used to hearing all kinds of worthless platitudes. Oftentimes, the people who share them don't actually think about what they're saying, they just go ahead and say things because it seems like the right thing to do.

For example: What's up with people who think the job market is the same as it was 30, 40, or even 50 years ago? You can't just walk into a business and expect to walk out with a job anymore. The world has moved to the impersonal nature of online applications, for better or worse (perhaps worse) and networking is key to securing any position. But many older people, especially those who've retired and have been out of the job market for a while don't stop to consider that.

After Redditor charrotte asked the online community, "What sounds like good advice but isn't?" people told us all about the so-called "good" advice they wish they hadn't received.


"How it really works..."

"Want that job? Just keep calling to check on the position. It ingrains you in the hiring manager's mind and makes them consider you more when your resume makes it to the top of their stack."

How it really works: The manager goes through the stack of resumes, finds yours, and throws it out. Then sends you a polite rejection email. You're meant to think the squeaky wheel gets the grease, but in reality, they just replace the wheel.

Liberi_Fatali561

"My parents were never like this..."

"Marry a doctor so you can live a better life." My parents were never like this but I had aunts and uncles who would tell their kids this regularly.

DemandParticular

"It sounds great..."

"Just do what you love!" It sounds great but a lot of people aren't good at what they love. It's important to do things you love but find a way to make a living too

FlatWatercress

"Pretty quick way..."

"If you get a job doing what you love, you will never work another day in your life."

Pretty quick way to murder all your favorite hobbies, and leave yourself with no means of escape or unwinding in your personal time. Happened to me when I transitioned from meditative painting to freelance artist. Biggest advice I give to aspiring artists, especially those who love drawing all day long and do nothing else: before going into art full-time, find a love for something completely unrelated to it.

QuarantineTitans

Yeah, sure.

Being bullied? Just ignore them.

zazzlekdazzle

"At heart..."

"Just be yourself."

At heart, this isn't bad advice, but it is too vague to really be useful to someone who needs it. Better put: be cognizant that you want to make a good impression, but don't do it in a way that misrepresents who you are or makes you uncomfortable.

zazzlekdazzle

"ANY advice that doesn't include..."

ANY advice that doesn't include nuance is bad advice. ANY advice followed without honest, self-assessment, is bad advice.

orange_cuse

"Live each day..."

Live each day like it's your last. See, dying people can do this because they don't have to deal with the consequences of their actions... you do.

glasstumble16

"Sometimes you just need to sleep on things..."

Don't go to bed angry with your significant other.

Sometimes you just need to sleep on things and take time to cool down....especially if you're like me and grouchy AF when you're tired. Don't try to force a resolution to a conflict.

AbortRetryImplode

"But forgetting only tells the person..."

Forgive and forget, always forgive. But forgetting only tells the person that you don't value yourself enough to not allow it to happen again. So no, I will forgive you and remember how you screwed me over, so that you can't do it to me again.

SingleSliceStudio

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