Workplaces require a certain structure to operate healthfully. Unfortunately, much like every other thing that requires specific skills for healthy operation, many workplaces do not retain this structure.

You can find these red flags buried in the interview, or else just in the employee culture.


What are they expecting you to do? If it's unreasonable, that's toxic. If they're not paying you enough, that's toxic. There are so many things to consider when taking a job.

u/Magnifolia asked:

What's a red flag that would put you off working for a company/boss?

Here were some of those answers.


Hiring Language

"Must be a self-starter" = We won't train you.

"Fast-paced environment" = We will overwork you.

"Must be able to multitask" = We fired three people and want you to do all their jobs.

captainmagictrousers

The Worst Type Of Bosses

Once at orientation for a new job the supervisor told me "We have a saying here: Think (name of workplace) first" and I immediately thought how I would never do that. It wasn't even a career type job, just something to pay the bills.

psychetron

And its always those kinds of jobs that at best pay $3 above min wage.

The day you start paying me $40+ /hour is the day I might prioritize this place over the rest of my life, otherwise you have my attention for 40 hours a week

kryo2019

Sorry, Who Are You?

Recently hired director of development set the goals for the year, he was asked in a large meeting if he'd talked to any of the developers about whether or not those goals were even possible.

His answer?

"It doesn't matter if people think it's possible, YOU'RE DOING IT, period. YOU HAVE NO CHOICE."

I've been through too many train-wrecks to stick around for this one, I'm out ASAP, and I'm not the only one jumping ship. Good luck with that, a**hole.

SomeoneHad2FuknSayIt

Sometimes it's all too easy to see a trainwreck coming from up the tracks.

No Expectations

There is no formal job description. That's a HUGE red flag.

Generally, that would mean that you won't know if you're doing well or not. If you are over- or under-performing. Or.. anything. It will always be super subjective.

swingorswole

Kind Of Misogyny Tho

I once was in an interview for a position in a tech company, with two tech guys and a woman from HR at the other side of the table.

The two tech guys kept sharing in-jokes that kept me and the HR woman out of the loop.

Gave me really bad vibes, and I could tell the HR woman was getting really uncomfortable.

Never spoke to them again.

CalmPilot101

All Of The Flags

I had an interviewer go for a smoke break once when I first started in my field.

Anywhere that states they value work/home ethics is a red flag. I ask "Who do you think here is an example good employee, and why?" Often the no go I hear is -"John Doe because he always gives 110% and works over hours! He missed his son's baseball game to hit a deadline."

Non-Negotiable salaries. The only places that don't fit their salaries to the person are places that don't value that specific person. It is okay if you're getting experience or NEED a job, but if you're a Subject Matter Expert you should be able to negotiate your salary and perks.

"Can you start tomorrow?" Or not respecting giving notice to your current company. Typically those places have high turn over and you'll notice with keywords like "Multitask", Fast-paced, expanding beyond what we're currently able to take"

Lastly any amount of cursing in the meeting.

AuCeallaigh

No Real Opportunity

My two worst bosses had disorganized offices.

Piles and piles of paper, random old technology, etc. Reviews were always late and only after ongoing demands for them.

Assignments come out of nowhere and are needed immediately. My mistakes are earthshaking but I also never have an opportunity to give them feedback.

It shows you they're in over their heads and you're going to have to manage up the sh*t out of them and get lucky to be successful.

bake7829

And honestly, NO job is worth any amount of emotional trauma.

They Rise To Fail

Someone, who when training you in a task you've never done before hides a mistake in it.

I get that they may want to see if you can spot it, but hey maybe let me know how to do it before you mess with it to test my problem solving or whatever.

They're literally setting you up to fail when you're the least confident in what you're doing.

Ryandhamilton18

Not Pretending There's No Pandemic

From now until my retirement, I will be asking everyone who interviews me for a job what their company did in response to the coronavirus.

Did the employer provide masks, hand sanitizer, or any other PPE to their employees? For customer service positions, what did they expect their customers to do, and how were those things enforced?

Were any changes, whether permanent or temporary, made to their policy for calling in sick?

I've been incredibly thankful for how seriously my current employer has been taking the virus. On the other hand, a friend of mine quit his job because his boss didn't believe that the virus is real. That's a red flag if I've ever seen one.

MasteringTheFlames

The Kids Don't Like It Either

Companies gaslight, which unfortunately is usually tough to pick up on before you're hired.

I'm a teacher. If you disagree with anything it's always said that "we're here for the kids."

Meant to make you feel guilty for disliking policies that increase stress, bore students, and teach to the test. Like if you don't do an hour of standardized test sample questions each day you don't care about your students

WipinAMarker

Learning to spot red flags early can save someone a lot of difficulty and trauma in their careers.

Obviously, not everybody will be able to avoid every toxic environment, but here is hoping we leave more and more toxic workplaces behind in 2021.

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