People Break Down Which Things They Still Wouldn't Purchase Even If They Were Filthy Rich

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When you don't have a lot of money, you learn to live without a few luxuries. The point where some things just start to feel unnecessary. Like, who really needs a yacht? It's just another house, but it floats, and it only incurs more and more expenses. A yacht comes with a high price tag.

As such, those of us who are perpetually figuring out where their next meal is coming from? We don't care about some things. And we probably wouldn't see a need for them as we got older and richer.


u/El_CM asked:

If you were filthy rich, what would you still refuse to buy?

Here were some of those answers.


Red Tape

Protection plan on video games/electronics.

I know previously with walmart issued protection plans, they're actually through a different company so even if your electronic does break you cant take it back to the store, you have to call, mail in it, and then wait for them to receive it just to get your money back.

nameismyluke

Living Space

I inherited a house that I lovingly call "a ramblin' ranch" - it's all 1 floor and has 3 bd and 2.5 baths. It's spacious enough, but definitely small compared to most other family homes in my 'burb (think 90's and 2000's McMansions) and definitely is still rockin' its original 80's vibe.

We seriously considered moving into a bigger house for about a year. Worked with an agent, saw tons of houses and after a year, we saw that though these houses were all bigger than our current house, not one of them was better than our current house (our house has a lot of unique features which are difficult to replicate in another home) and we've decided to stay and renovate instead and I think we'll be happier (and much less light in the pocket) for it.

tappytaps

Nightmare HOA Stories

A house with a ridiculous HOA monthly fee.

My husband and I have built our house in a community that has an HOA, but it's only $40 a month and they leave us alone. What prompted my comment is that the community next to us charges $350 a month and comes with pools, a rec center, parks and even a small lake, but that still wouldn't make me want to pay that much on top of my mortgage.

candiice_xo

Diamonds Are Forever

Diamonds. Everything I learn about the jewelry diamond industry bothers me. From the marketing that makes people think that men have to spend a fortune to prove their love and the weird way that an identical lab grown diamond "just isn't the same" to the exploitation of diamond miners and immense human suffering because of wars financed by diamonds, I say from the bottom of my heart, f**k diamonds.

Also they're the most boring looking gemstone. Of all the beautiful colored options in the world, why did we have to settle on a clear one.

(I don't actually know anything about industrial diamonds so I'm not hating on industrial diamonds and from a science perspective, diamonds are cool. I just hate jewelry diamonds).

CarsonNapierOfAmtor

But If It's Haunted?

Antiques- especially antique mirrors. I mean yeah, the value could appreciate greatly over time and yeah, there's a slim chance that it might be enchanted but it's just not worth the gamble on the 0.01% chance that it's haunted.

thatmarxian

A Repurposing

Bags for bathroom trash cans. That's what plastic grocery bags are for. (Even in CA, where we're not supposed to have plastic grocery bags, they have made a comeback during COVID.)

pumpkinspicerabbit

The Guilt Of Spending

Honestly, a lot of things.

I once did the thought experiment, and I realised that if I have a home that I own, and a car and such, I'd struggle to genuinely spend £70k a year (honestly, I might struggle to spend 50k), even if I bought the most expensive "normal" things I'd need. Could I spend 5 million a year? Abso-freaking-lutely I could. But not without going silly on things (you know, buying a 250k supercar instead of a normal car) and artificially going "I want to spend this money".

Like, I wouldn't be changing my diet or my choice in clothes - they're purely functional, it makes no difference to me if my shirt cost £12 or £1200 (well, not strictly true, if I was wearing a £1200 shirt, I'd be going "what the hell was I thinking, spending £1200 on a shirt?" at myself in my head almost constantly).

I'd spend more on my hobbies, and probably travel a bit more, but not dramatically more (though I would go at least business class everywhere, because god its so much more comfortable).

I guess I'm just not that materialistic. I'd rather have board game night every week with my friends than have designer clothes or anything like that.

One exception... maybe a nice big private island to hide from the humans on.

axw3555

My Car Is Also My Place In Society

A new car. I would just let other rich people buy theirs new and drive it for a year before they get bored of it and buy a new one.

There are plenty of great vehicles on the market simply because some people can afford to view their transportation as a status symbol.

BigBadZord

Just A Comfortable Life

Over priced cars and clothes. I wanna be rich but not in a in your face way. I wanna be rich but you don't think I'm rich. A nice-ish house? Yes. A decent car? Yes. Designer and tesla? Nah. I just wanna take care of me, my girlfriend, and any potential children I have or adopt.

thesquiddlesink

Just Eat It

Caviar

Rolex watches

limousines

branded antihistamine (off brand does exactly the same thing)

Basically, any sort of overpriced bull. For me, it's not just that I've lived my life appreciating stuff of similar or equal quality, but at a lesser price, but a matter of refusing to feed greed, without getting anything back in return.

I'm not a cheapskate. When my mechanic replaces a headlight globe, and only charges for the part, I make him charge for installation as well, but when some corporation thinks it's cute to charge more than double for anti-allergy medication, because they have advertising and a shinier box, they can eat a bag of dicks.

Sagelegend

Image by Tumisu from Pixabay

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