Rob Kim/Getty Images, Randy Shropshire/Getty Images for SAG-AFTRA Foundation, Netflix, @thedrewpowell/Twitter

When it comes to exploding rats, Russians infiltrating a suburban mall and a psychokinetic girl fending off otherworldly monsters, Stranger Things is never in short supply of unusual phenomena.

But you know what?

There are no stranger things than being on the internet.


Fans of Netflix's Sci-Fi hit that takes place in the 1980s are getting their acid-washed jeans and scrunchies in a bunch over a jaw-dropping phenomenon that is weirder than the Upside-Down.

The unlikely bromance between Dustin and Steve – portrayed by Gaten Matarazzo and Joe Keery, respectively – has become what many viewers regarded as a highlight from season two.
Now one amazing observation regarding those two is becoming a huge trending moment.

Twitter user Trevor White uncovered old photos and pointed out that a younger David Harbour – who plays the chief of police Jim Hopper from the show – looks just like Steve, while an adolescent Patton Oswalt looks exactly like Dustin.

Harbour, 44, and Oswalt, 50, are friends in real life.

And based on the juxtaposed photos above, the younger gentlemen perfectly rocked their 80s coifs just like the characters they are being compared to.

So far, Oswalt responded to the viral madness.

Twitter is eating this up like a hot dog on a stick.








Fans have but one request of Harbour and Oswalt.



Eleven has only this to say.

There's only one way to recover from this Stranger Things mania: gorging on the USS Butterscotch from Scoops Ahoy from the Starcourt Mall.

See you there!

You can get season 1 & 2 of Stranger Things in retro packaging designed to look like VHS tapes here.

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Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash

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However, a study that followed 1,420 from 1992 to 2015 found conclusive results about childhood trauma:

"'It is a myth to believe that childhood trauma is a rare experience that only affects few,' the researchers say."
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"A surprising 60 percent of those in the study were exposed to at least one trauma by age 16. Over 30 percent were exposed to multiple traumatic events."

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On the outside, so many professions and careers look glamorous, financially enticing, and fun.

Often we sit back in our own lives and wallow in our dead-end jobs with that "wish I could do that for a living mentality!"

But if you look a little closer or, much like Dorothy Gale in OZ, just wait for a Toto to push the curtain back, you'll see that a lot more is going on behind the scenes.

And the shenanigans we don't see, make all that fun... evaporate.

So many careers and high power industries are built on a foundation of lies, backstabbing, and stress. And not in that fun "Dynasty" way.

That quiet, dead-end gig may not be so bad after all.

Redditor MethodicallyDeep wanted hear all the tea about certain careers, by asking:

What is a secret in your industry that should be talked about?
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