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"Thank U, Next" is a major chart-topping hit song by Arianna Grande and it has become a defining pop cultural catchphrase of 2018.

But the singer's sassy dismissal turns out to have origins going back further than we thought.

Elite Daily featured a resurfaced video of a 2015 Vanity Fair interview featuring Grande and her Scream Queens cast mates, Abigail Breslin, Billie Lourd, and Emma Roberts, commenting on famous squeals from iconic horror movies.


Ariana Grande and The Scream Queens Cast React to the Most Iconic Screams in Movies www.youtube.com

After discussing Sarah Michelle Geller's "high-pitched squeal" from a scene in 1997's I Know What You Did Last Summer, Grande indicated she was ready to move on to the next scene by yelling, "Thank you, next!"

Fans are unsure if the phrase was part of Grande's daily parlance back then or if she was stealthily dropping the title of the song that would be unleashed three years in the future

Regardless, fans had some fun speculating about the origins of "Thank U, Next."





She must be some kind of marketing genius.


There is no such thing as coincidence, right?




"Thank U, Next" was the lead single from her eponymous fifth studio album. The track was written by Grande, Charles Anderson, Michael Foster, Tayla Parx, Tommy Brown, and Victoria Monét.

The lyrics refer to the singer's past relationships, including Big Sean, Ricky Alvarez (her backup dancer), Pete Davidson, and Mac Miller.

"Thought I'd end up with Sean, / But he wasn't a match. / Wrote some songs about Ricky. / Now I listen and laugh. / Even almost got married, / And for Pete, I'm so thankful. / Wish I could say, 'Thank you' to Malcolm / 'Cause he was an angel."

The popular music video was released on November 30, 2018, and is an homage to rom-coms of the '90s, parodying Mean Girls, Bring It On, 13 Going on 30, and Legally Blonde.

According to Complex, Grande told a fan that the phrase was something she and her friend Victoria Monét, who shares co-writing credits on the song, used to say.

Call it what you will, but her quip from the Vanity Fair interview three years ago is what putting something out there looks like.

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