People Explain Which Strange Things Are Considered Normal In Their Home Country But Weird Everywhere Else
Image by Pezibear from Pixabay

What is in the water in the United States that compels people to walk around in their homes with their shoes on? Try doing that in South Korea––people would be so mortified. I have a sibling whose apartment is carpeted from wall to wall and who walks around inside with his shoes on all the time, tracking in any manner of dirt and dust from outside. Egad! I get chills just thinking about it. And as an American, it's something I've noticed people from other countries love to comment on.

We learned a lot more about things that are considered normal in other countries after Redditor monitonik asked the online community,

"What's normal in your country that's considered weird in others?"

"I grew up in Australia..."

"I grew up in Australia and migrated to Ireland about ten years ago. First thing I noticed was people in Ireland really like to talk about death in everyday conversation: Who died. When the mass is. The removal of the body and the anniversaries of their death. It's so normal in conversation."

theman_dalorian

"Leaving a baby..."

"Leaving a baby bundled up outside to sleep. When my previous neighbours had a baby, sometimes I would pass it on the porch, just sleeping. Including in winter as long as it wasn't too cold."

SevenLight

And in the United States, rest assured that child services would be called ASAP.

"In Japan..."

"In Japan, there are public toilets in a few places where after urinating, you can opt to view a general health assessment report."

Family456

Sounds like a privacy issue, no?

"I live in Malaysia..."

"I live in Malaysia and nearly everyone here uses at least three languages in a sentence."

noviethepleb

Spend some time in Miami. The official language of the city is Spanglish.

"There's this sport..."

"There's this sport in Finland called eukonkanto, where men participate in running a specific distance, all while carrying their wife or girlfriend. Winner gets their woman's weight in beer."

VenenoG

Sounds fun!

"It's a small country..."

"Probably talking to people so that no one else can hear you except the person you are directly talking to.

It's a skill almost all Dutch people have, I have found, but it can be very unnerving for other people because you can be sitting pretty close to two people having a conversation and have no idea what they are saying.

It's a small country and very densely populated with people who value their privacy. It's a survival skill, really."

zazzlekdazzle

Can we bring this to the United States? Why are people so LOUD here?

"Some areas in the country..."

"Saying "hi" or waving to strangers. Some areas in the country take it even further and you're considered rude if you drive through a residential street and don't wave to anyone walking as you pass them."

galactica_pegasus

"If you're walking with a dog..."

"Walking all over the countryside along ancient footpaths (as well as bridleways and byways, and a lot of disused railway tracks that have been designated as footpaths). These paths often go across privately owned land; the landowners are required by law to keep the paths clear, and if they put up a fence to provide a gate.

If you're walking with a dog, you're expected to keep it under control around livestock and when the path crosses a road, but otherwise it's just accepted that dogs are going to run around sniffing everything."

BillyBobThistledon

"We have robots..."

"We have robots at busy intersections and crossing points to assist and control traffic flow."

LateCumback

Nice to see Chappie is getting some work.

"The other day..."

​"I teach in Japan but grew up in America. The other day my students asked me wide-eyed if Americans really wear their shoes inside. I told them yes and that sometimes my dad would cross his legs like this while we sat on the sofa and I could touch the bottom of his shoes. They were super grossed out. "Eew, why would you wear shoes inside! That's so dirty!" These kids are 2nd graders so it starts pretty young."

coffeecatmint

It never hurts to travel––you'll broaden your horizons and learn more about other cultures! When the pandemic's over––I mean actually over––and it's safe enough to travel, I might just hire someone to play my wife and take part in that Finnish wife-carrying contest. Some beer sounds great.

Have some observations of your own? Feel free to tell us all about them in the comments section below!

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