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YouTube: Netflix UI Engineering

While its grip has lessened in recent years, Netflix's control on our viewing habits is still massive. It's so easy to binge watch an entire season of a new TV show you discovered with the only nuisance being the "Are you still watching?" prompt you need to pick up the remote to answer. At least until you can control it hands-free, right? Like, say, with just moving your eyes?

Hack Day Fall 2018 - Eye Nav www.youtube.com

That day might be sooner than you think. During Netflix's recent Hack Day, their engineers developed a bunch of new ideas. Some were silly, like a button that jumps to the shark scenes in Sharknado.

The Eye Nav seems just as ridiculous at first, but has some real potential. It allows you to control the Netflix App on an iPhone by moving your eye. It uses the sensors that allow for accurate Face ID scanning to read which part of the screen you're staring at, and make a selection. Sticking your tongue out acts as a 'dismiss'.

People seem excited for the possibilities







Now before you start bellyaching about how this is going to make us even lazier, keep in mind, this was thrown together in 24 hours for Hack Day, and may never be planned to be released to the general public. In any case, it's far from finished. Additionally, it has real potential as an accessibility feature.

However, not everyone was on board with the idea.




In the past, Netflix's Hack Days have spawned strange ideas like a one button mode, which uses Morse code to search, or putting Netflix on the NES. On the more useful end, they came up with Audiobook mode, which would use the Audio Description mode available on shows to treat them more like an audiobook.

H/T: Inc, Verge

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