Nathan Ivie/Facebook

Nathan Ivie, a Republican lawmaker from Utah, recently came out as gay in a video posted to Facebook.


Ivie, a Utah County commissioner, recorded a video posted to his Facebook, dedicated to friends, family and neighbors.

The 40 year-old Mormon lawmaker revealed that he is gay, a secret he has struggled with since he was a child.

In the video, he speaks of growing up confused and unsure of himself, which led to a suicide attempt at age 22. After that, he attempted to "cure" his homosexual feelings, due to the pressure he felt by being a part of the Mormon church.

The religion traditionally opposes gay marriage, but with so many young LGBTQ people committing suicide as of late, Ivie felt the need to take a stand.

"That really makes you re-evaluate your life, and what you're doing as a leader to prevent that kind of stuff," says Ivie in his video, which has now been viewed over 11,000 times.

"I understand the impact that my discoveries have had, and will have on others. Yet, I'm still the same person that I've always been."

He continues, talking about the interactions he's had with gay couples through his love for photography and the outdoors.

Ivie recently had the opportunity to photograph a same-sex wedding, an experience that changed the way he viewed himself.

"The love they shared and the way they looked at each other was the same as any other couple. It helped me realize, 'Maybe I'm not broken.'"

Ivie's story has gone viral on social media, with many commenting on his video. Almost all of the responses have been positive.



Ivie himself responded on Twitter to the internet's reaction.

He thanked his parents for their support.

Ivie continued, leaving Twitter with some very positive and hopeful words.

Ivie's community has shown him nothing but support. Jackie Biskupski, Salt Lake City's first openly gay mayor, echoed other politicians' well wishes.

Despite Ivie and his wife separating, they decided to co-parent their children and still remain close friends.

"One thing's for certain," Ivie concluded. "Tomorrow is a new day."

"The sun will come up again, and we'll all have work and responsibilities, things to do. Who I am, it doesn't change any of that."
Harry Cunningham/Unsplash

You may have heard of the phrase "retail therapy" before, which is the act of buying things for personal enjoyment.

Well, there's some truth to that.

The University of Michigan actually studied the affects of shopping on our sadness levels. Purchasing something you enjoy can actually decrease sadness 40 times better than not purchasing something.

There are tons of other benefits like dopamine increases, anxiety reduction and improved mood. We wanted to know what people are buying to give them that rush of happy hormones and increase their joy.

Keep reading... Show less
Jessica Podraza/Unsplash

When we think of a "hero" we might think of someone in a cape who's saving civilians from terror. Or maybe we think of the essential workers we've called heroes throughout the pandemic.

Heroism is simply defined as "great bravery," according to Oxford Languages.

If being a hero is about showing courage, bravery and strength, heroic feats happen all around us every day with ordinary people.

Keep reading... Show less
Sharon McCutcheon/Unsplash

They say good things come in small packages—as a lifelong member of the "Never hit 5 feet tall" club it's a phrase I've had thrown at me often.

It's right up there with "small but mighty" and "people mcnugget."

It's popular because there's a fair bit of truth to it, though.

When it comes to some things, smaller is just flat out better.

Keep reading... Show less
OSPAN ALI on Unsplash

Everyone has their "type" when it comes to sexual attraction.

It could be a woman's scent, a man's fashion sense, or a confident attitude that really gets a heart fluttering at 100 m.p.h.
However, what someone thinks is "hot" or "sexy" may be a total turn-off for others.
Keep reading... Show less