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The six figure salary is the crown jewel of professional aspirations.


That seductive, round-numbered, annual cash flow would provide a life of security for so many of us. Of course, getting to a job with that salary is easier said than done.

But plenty of people out here do have that salary.

They probably don't appear super rich when we see them walk around. They wear typical clothes and do typical things for fun. And yet they walk around on just a little bit more cushion.

A recent inspiring thread on Reddit showed that the $150K annual salary is absolutely possible.

Plaidshirt17 asked, "Redditors who make over $150K/year, what do you do for a living and how did you get to that position?"

It wasn't surprising to see that plenty of people in the $150k echelon were involved in the tech sector in some way. Let's face it, that's where the money is.

Getting In Early

"I joined Apple in '02 as an engineer."

"My stock options were generous at the time, and even though I was more optimistic than most, Apple's financial performance surprised even me."

-- ReasonReader

Going Through the Motions

"I attend meetings that could've been emails and I pretend to code between said meetings. I solved brainteasers to get the position." -- eloel-

"I too am a Software Engineer." -- kingfrito_5005

Compensated Psychics

"I code, but that's the easy part of the job. The actual job is dealing with extremely eccentric personalities and being a mind-reader." -- Independent_Dog5167

"Right?! I'm still working on breaking 100k but already I've had to develop my mind-reading skills and hand hold and cater to the most obnoxious types of people." -- Knuckles316

Tough, But Worth It?

"Move to SF Bay Area where if you work your butt off and don't stop building skills in the tech field, a 150k job will fall into your lap."

"Took me 3 years to go from 0 to 150, but that was a 3 years I'll never want to do again."

-- SS324

Other people who make that much are specialists. They put in the time and work to amass a unique set of skills that made them indispensable--and financially valuable.

A LOT of Earth Knowledge

"Geologist / Geophysicist. I started as a physicist then decided I wanted to go camping more." -- thealbinorthino504

"This seems to be the way to go. I started as a geologist and went into geophysics, most of the class was physics students and our lecturer was a physics prof. He worked to his students and one by one the geology students failed." -- Zpaset

People Share The 'Dirty Secrets' That Their Bosses Don't Want Customers To Know

There's a lot businesses hope their customers believe, and there are many business practices you wouldn't dare believe. These are some of the secrets Reddit ...

Life In School

"Doctor. Took 12 years of training after high school:"

  • "4 years of undergrad
  • 4 years of medical school
  • 3 years of residency
  • 1 year of fellowship"

"Average hours of work per week during residency was around 70. Busiest weeks involved working over 110 hours in 7 days."

-- drdiddlegg

One Step Backward, Two Steps Forward

"Went back to college for accounting at 27. Took a full time class load while working full time. The first public accounting job out of school (graduated at 33) was a $20k pay cut for me and required working at least 70 hours a week for a good part of the year."

"After two years, I got my CPA license and one of my previous professors called me up and hired me as the International Accounting Manager for a software company but I had to relocate, which I did. I worked there for two years and took the Controller position at an Aerospace Manufacturer. I now am right at $150k and hit that mark five and a half years out of school."

"Basically, worked my a** off, was willing to relocate, but also entered my current industry with ten years of management experience in the construction industry, which really helped to move quickly."

-- OneChillinVillain

Indispensible

"CFO of a medium sized multinational company."

Worked a ton. Emphasized making everyone else's job easier. First one to volunteer to eat 'the black jelly beans.' "

"Always willing to relocate."

-- SpotCon

A Rare Setup

"Attorney. I went to law school, and then cultivated a practice in a lucrative regulatory area."

"I provide advice regarding an area where large companies touch the SEC directly, so they are willing to pay a great deal to ensure that it is done right."

"The thing about this income bracket is that the only way you'll get a salary up that high is by having a great deal of leverage. Either you have an extremely rare skill, or are a trusted professional who handles a job where there is no tolerance for failure (which is rare in and of itself)."

-- The_Law_of_Pizza

One Step Ahead

"Business consultancy."

"Required skills: knowing one more thing than anyone else in the room, or being able to bluff that you know one more thing than anyone else in the room."

-- TheWrongFuseBox

Popularity Helps

"My husband makes $280k/year as a VP of Design for an apparel company and I make $130k/year as a marketing director for an e-comm business."

"Husband dropped out of trade school to start his own clothing brand, hustled, built a reputation as being loyal and kind to work with/for and from there, job offers started coming in."

"I took the more traditional route: got my MBA and worked my way up to where I am now."

"Moral of the story: it helps when people really like to work for you and with you."

-- AKinKC

And some people managed to make $150k doing something they fell into. Often blue collar jobs, these positions also require a very unique set of skills that make a practitioner very valuable.

A Small Investment With a Big Return

"Heavy equipment mechanic."

"Took an 8 month course for 5k and bought some tools. Had no interest in it before but it turned out to have a great community and challenging, interesting work with a TON of variety."

-- mydogisamy

Catching a Break

"I manage large industrial accounts and negotiate contracts for a commodities company. College dropout. I had just gotten fired from a retail job for messing around, and had been out of work for a couple months. Sent out 127 resumes. No callbacks."

"Watching a TV show and the character names a company hes working for, and I think to myself... theres one of those in Nashville...so i sent a resume. Only place that called me back for an interview. Started in entry level position, and did well. moved and promoted multiple times."

-- derek_g_S

Dedication Pays

"I make 120k/year where im at but if i moved to a more busy station i could break 150. Railroad Conductor. Requires a GED, and you to be able to show up on time, sober, and ready to work whenever they call you."

-- damndingashrubbery

Fake It Til You Make It

"I'm a field engineer for live TV shows. I take care of the technical requirements to go live from anywhere in the world- anywhere from a city street to a remote national park to underwater."

"I started at an entry level manual labor job on a TV show through a family connection- as is very common in this industry. I did occasional freelance work for about 5 years before I got offered a full time engineering position."

"My advice for anyone coming into film/TV is pretty standard- learn everything you can even if it's not your job, say yes first then figure it out later, and always have a positive, can-do attitude. It's also not for everyone- long hours, frequently outside rain or shine, terrible work-life balance."

-- mpegfour

All About the Overtime

"High Voltage Lineman."

"Made over 300k in 2020. LOTS of overtime. Base pay is 105k. Even with that I turned down 1 in 6 OT opportunities and took my vacation and sick time."

"It can be dangerous, you work rotating shifts, you're out in bitter cold, wet or hot weather. You work at extreme heights and underground enclosures."

"It's very satisfying though."

"Call your local electrical union hall and or electric utility."

-- Qordz


So yes, those jobs are out there. They will not be given to you, and, as we know, there are so many unjust, institutional barriers that keep these positions at bay for countless people.

But with some luck and the right credentials, there are opportunities out there.

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Image by Anemone123 from Pixabay

Life is hard. It's a miracle to make it through with some semblance of sanity. We are all plagued by grief and trauma. More and more people of all backgrounds are opening up about personal trauma and its origins. Finally! For far too long we've been too silent on this topic. And with so many people unable to afford mental health care, the outcomes can be damaging.

All of our childhoods have ups and downs and memories that can play out like nightmares. We carry that, or it follows us and the first step in recovery is talking about it. So who feels strong enough to speak?

Redditor u/nthn_thms wanted to see who was willing to share about things they'd probably rather forget, by asking:

What's the most traumatizing thing you experienced as a child?
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Image by klimkin from Pixabay

Being single can be fun. In fact, in this time of COVID, being single can save lives. But the heart is a fickle creature.

And being alone can really suck in times of turmoil. None of us are perfect and it feels like that's all anyone is looking for... perfect.

Now that doesn't mean that all of us are making it difficult to partner up. Sure, some people are too picky and mean-spirited, but some of the rest of us are crazy and too much to handle. So one has to be sure.

The truth is, being single is confusing, no matter how much we try to match. So let's try to understand...

Redditor u/Mcxyn wanted to discuss some truths about love and our own issues, by asking:

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Tiard Schulz/Unsplash

Whether you're an at home parent, a college student just leaving the nest, or a Food Network junkie, there are a few basic tips that everyone should know.

Chef's gave us some of their top tips for amateurs and beginner at home cooks that will really make a difference. They are trained professionals with years of experience in the kitchen, so they definitely know what we're all missing.

If you're looking to improve some of your cooking skills and techniques, but you're still learning how to boil water correctly, this list is for you.

Redditor BigBadWolf44 wanted in on the secrets and asked:

"Chefs of Reddit, what's one rule of cooking amateurs need to know?"

Let's learn from the masters!


What a common mistake!

"A lot of the time when people add salt to a dish because they think it tastes flat, what it really needs is an acid like lemon juice or vinegar."

- Vexvertigo

"Instructions unclear I drugged my dinner party guests and now they're high on acid."

- itsyoboi_human

"Yes! Or tomatoes. They're pretty acidic too and go with so many things. Our dinners are so much better once the garden tomatoes are ripe. Or if a dish is too acidic, oil/butter or a little sugar can help add balance to it."

- darkhorse85

"Like tomato and eggs. Every Chinese mom makes those slightly differently and I haven't had a tomato egg dish I didn't like yet."

- random314

"There's a book called 'Salt Fat Acid Heat' that comes highly recommended to amateur cooks."

- Osolemia

"Reading even just the first chapter about salt made a lot of food I cooked immediately better, because I finally understood salt wasn't just that thing that sat on the dinner table that you applied after the meal was cooked."

- VaultBoy42

"Salt is important for sweets. A batch of cookies without that little hint of salt doesn't taste quite right."

- Osolemia

Unfortunately, this tip might not be accessible to everyone. Many people who contracted COVID can no longer use their sense of smell the way they used to.

"Have a friend that lost his smell from COVID, and now he only recognizes if food is salty, sweet, sour or bitter."

- AlphaLaufert99

"Just wait until he gets his sense of smell back and a ton of foods smell like ammonia or literal garbage now. Yeah, that's fun... It's been 7 months for f*cks sake just let me enjoy peanut butter again!!!!!!!!!"

- MirzaAbdullahKhan

You can't take back what you've already put in.

"You can always add, but you cannot take away."

- El_Duende666

"I find people's problems usually are they're too scared to add rather than they add too much."

- FreeReflection25

"I see you also grew up white in the mid-west."

- Snatch_Pastry

Safety first!

"Not really a cooking tip, but a law of the kitchen: A falling knife has no handle."

- wooddog

"I'm always so proud of my reflexes for not kicking in when I fumble a knife."

"If I drop anything else, my stupid hands are all over themselves trying to catch it (and often failing). But with a knife the hardwired automatic reaction is jump back immediately. Fingers out of the way, feet out of the way, everything out of the way. Good lookin out, cerebellum!"

- sonyka

"Speaking of KICKING in. On first full time cooking job I had a knife spin and fall off the counter. My (stupid) reflex was to put my foot under it like a damn hacky sack to keep it from hitting the ground. Went through the shoe, somehow between my toes, into the sole somehow without cutting me. Lessons learned: (1) let it fall; (2) never set a knife down close to the edge or with the handle sticking out; (3) hacky sack is not nearly as cool as it could be."

- AdjNounNumbers

"Similarly, NEVER put out a grease or oil fire with water. Smother with a lid or dump baking soda in there (do not use flour, as it can combust in the air making things worse)."

- Metallic_Substance

How else will you know it tastes good?

"Taste the food."

- OAKRAIDER64

"Also don't be afraid to poke and prod at it. I feel like people think the process is sacred and you can't shape/flip/feel/touch things while you cook them. The more you are hands on, the more control you have."

"No, this does not include situations where you are trying to sear something. Ever try flipping a chicken thigh early? That's how you rip a chunk out of it and leave it glued to the pan until it's burnt."

- Kryzm

Here's one just for laughs.

"When you grab a pair of tongs, click them a few times to make sure they are tongs."

- Kolshdaddy

"People really overlook this one. You've gotta tong the tongs a minimum of 3 times to make sure they tong, or else it can ruin the whole dish."

- BigTimeBobbyB

If you're looking to get into cooking or to improve you technique, pay attention to these few tips.

Salt generously, add an acid to brighten things up, and don't forget to taste your food!

If all else fails, you can always order take out.

Want to "know" more? Never miss another big, odd, funny, or heartbreaking moment again. Sign up for the Knowable newsletter here.

Victoria_Borodinova/Pixaba

As part of the learning process, children often do embarrassing things before they learn a little more about the world and all the different implications therein. While the inappropriate moment is usually minor and ends in laugher some instances are truly mortifying.

One such instance involved a little sister who was around 6 at the time. It was the 90s and at the height of the youth-focused PSAs (think the frying egg representing your brain). One type was a safety PSA about stranger danger. The speaker would remind the children that if a stranger tried to take you anywhere to yell “Stop, you're not my mommy/daddy" to raise the alarm.

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