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Just days after announcing that she was quitting Twitter indefinitely, Lizzo was hit with more body-shaming, this time from "Biggest Loser" physical trainer, Jillian Michaels.

But yesterday, whether it was meant as a reaction to Michaels' comments or not, Lizzo wrote on Instagram a post about self-love that was so perfectly timed, it could have only been planned out by Lizzo herself.


Michaels faced serious backlash after her comments about Lizzo's body earlier this week. Comments are still pouring in on the AM to DM post.

Michaels has come under fire before for her abusive style of personal training and the lack of long-term success of those she bullied to drastic weight loss on shows like The Biggest Loser.

In the midst of the ongoing conversation, Lizzo has not returned to Twitter and did not directly comment in the conversation or on Michaels' thoughts about celebrating her body. Instead, she shared a video on Instagram about self-love.

In the incredibly timely video, Lizzo says nothing. She shares a video from her perspective, starting with a shot of her legs while she's on her bed, followed by a quick tour of the luxurious suite she's staying in.

Finally, she goes out to the balcony, where viewers can see the tremendous view she has, with water and a beautiful sky in the distance. Just faintly over the sound of the highway, birds can be heard chirping.

Lizzo wrote in the caption:

"At the 25 second mark, I want you to take 5 deep breaths... In through the nose... out through the mouth..."
"Today's mantra is: This is my life. I have done nothing wrong. I forgive myself for thinking I was wrong in the first place. I deserve to be happy."

You can see Lizzo's Instagram post here:

The comments have been overwhelmingly positive, reacting to Lizzo's message, the beautiful scenery and the deep-breathing exercise.

@lizzobeeating / Instagram


@lizzobeeating / Instagram


@lizzobeeating / Instagram


@lizzobeeating / Instagram


@lizzobeeating / Instagram


@lizzobeeating / Instagram


@lizzobeeating / Instagram


@lizzobeeating / Instagram


@lizzobeeating / Instagram

Though it seems Twitter brings with it a lot of trolls for Lizzo, it seems Instagram is a much safer, calmer space for the artist to practice self-love while continuing to do what she does best: creating music and spreading joy to many.

No matter what's been discussed this week, Lizzo is on a tremendous path to success, with fans who celebrate her music, her persistence, her positivity and her self-acceptance.

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