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With Hurricane Florence bearing down on the east coast, the Carolinas dealt with many, many logistical issues which accompany a full scale evacuation.

Though these steps can be stressful, there is one job that completely recharges one's faith in humanity:

assigning dogs from local shelters to temporary foster families from deeper inland.


Coastal shelters were right in the path of the storm, so the dogs (and other animals) were evacuated for their own safety.

Sometimes humans can be not so great, but in this instance they stepped up to help take care of the "people" who needed it.

The next thing you know, foster dogs were safe and sound in their temporary homes!

People shared photos of their houseguests on Twitter.


Every pooch was pawsitively adorable!



Some shelters, like Saving Grace NC, also prepared for an influx of coastal pups separated from their families during the storm.

@SavingGraceNC/Twitter


@SavingGraceNC/Twitter


@SavingGraceNC/Twitter



Helping a dog in need is good for your soul...though maybe not so good for your productivity when they prove too irresistible to ignore.

Sometimes a small gesture is all it takes to be a hero.

If you are evacuating from a hurricane, or any other natural disaster, be sure to think about your pet and bring them with you if you can!

They count on their human's help more than anything. But some agencies providing evacuation resources for the poor and elderly do not allow pets, forcing people to choose between sheltering in place with their pets or leaving them behind.



While some groups only criticize those given the tough choice of staying put with their pet or being evacuated, a better solution is to pressure your local, state and federal officials to always accommodate pets when evacuating the poor and elderly or to set up animal evacuations in addition to the human ones.

H/T - Twitter, The Dodo

Clint Patterson/Unsplash

Conspiracy theories are beliefs that there are covert powers that be changing the course of history for their own benefits. It's how we see the rise of QAnon conspiracies and people storming the capital.

Why do people fall for them? Well some research has looked into the reasons for that.

The Association for Psychological Science published a paper that reviewed some of the research:

"This research suggests that people may be drawn to conspiracy theories when—compared with nonconspiracy explanations—they promise to satisfy important social psychological motives that can be characterized as epistemic (e.g., the desire for understanding, accuracy, and subjective certainty), existential (e.g., the desire for control and security), and social (e.g., the desire to maintain a positive image of the self or group)."

Whatever the motivations may be, we wanted to know which convoluted stories became apart of peoples consciousness enough for them to believe it.

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Image by Enrique Meseguer from Pixabay

I hate ghosts, even if it's Casper. My life is already stressful enough. I don't need to creeped out by spirits from the beyond. Shouldn't they be resting and basking in the glow of the great beyond instead of menacing the rest of us?

The paranormal seems to be consistently in unrest, which sounds like death isn't any more fun or tranquil than life. So much for something to look forward to.

Some ghosts just like to scare it up. It's not always like "Ghosthunters" the show.

Redditor u/Murky-Increase4705 wanted to hear about all the times we've faced some hauntings that left us shook, by asking:

Reddit, what are your creepy encounters with something that you are convinced was paranormal?
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Image by Denise Husted from Pixabay

The past year brought about much anxiety and it's been a challenge to find the light in what has felt like perpetual darkness.

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Image by Gabriela Sanda from Pixabay

A lot of talk going on about women's bodies, isn't there?

Not necessarily with women front and center as part of the conversation, unfortunately.

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