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A dancer recently diagnosed with breast cancer received a surprise duet with Jewel at Jewel's concert on Thursday. And here come the tears...


Angela Trimbur, an actress and dancer from LA who was recently diagnosed with breast cancer, got a "beautiful, life-affirming pick-me-up" after Jewel invited her up on stage to perform side-by-side.


A friend of Trimbur's, Sarah Utterback, wrote to Jewel, saying "Trimbur always loved playing her music after dance workshops" and that Trimbur played Jewel's "Hands" in the last workshop she taught before her double mastectomy.

"It was a deeply moving and emotionally raw moment in a room with 80 women, rocking in a circle, turning to each other, placing their hands together in prayer, bowing, seeing, honoring each other and themselves," Utterback wrote. "Angela creates moments like this, and for this, I would like to create a moment for her."


We'd say Jewel's response, inviting the girl up for an emotional duet, was more than perfect.








In a time of great suffering for many, we hope this story can start the healing.

H/T: People, Instagram

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