JOIN
OUR EMAIL LIST!
@mshamline21/Twitter, @RocketMortgage/Twitter

Commercial slots aired during the Super Bowl are highly coveted, and you can bet on some outrageous advertisements.

One of the most bizarre commercials involved actor Jason Momoa shedding his skin.


We are used to seeing the hunky tattooed bod of the Aquaman star, but nothing could prepare fans for the visual nightmare to come during the airing of the LIV Super Bowl.

Home lending company Rocket Mortgage featured the former Game of Thrones actor about being "comfortable in his own skin."

We all know Momoa does not shy away from going shirtless whether he is on or off camera, but home viewers were not expecting his interpretation about being comfortable in his own skin.

Momoa started off the ad successfully evading the paparazzi and describing what "home" meant to him.

"It's the one place I can let my guard down."

Then things took a bizarre turn when he said:

"It's where I can just kick back and be totally comfortable in my own skin."

He cooly delivered the line while tearing off the outer layers of his burly arms, revealing significantly lankier limbs.


Momoa was just getting started.

He continued to shed other parts of his body and gradually exposed a significantly leaner physique.

Fans simply could not process what they were seeing.

He continued:

"Rocket Mortgage understands that home is where I can be myself and that feels pretty darn good."

And with that, he ripped off his toupee and had the audacity to give his dumbstruck fans a casual smirk to the camera.





The ad concluded with Momoa's wife and actress, Lisa Bonet, spotting him on the bench press and revealing her strength by nimbly racking away the barbell he was struggling with.




Fans were shook.








Most of Twitter lauded Rocket Mortgage for their humorous ad.







Did Rocket Mortgage score big time with their freakish commercial?

Or did seeing a gangling Aquaman leave you wanting to seek a new lease on life?

Image by Mary Pahlke from Pixabay

There are few things more satisfying than a crisp $20 bill. Well, maybe a crisp $100 bill.

But twenty big ones can get you pretty far nonetheless.

Whether it's tucked firmly in a birthday card, passing from hand to hand after a knee-jerk sports bet, or going toward a useful tool, the old twenty dollar bill has been used for countless purposes.


Keep reading... Show less
Image by Jan Vašek from Pixabay

I realize that school safety has been severely compromised and has been under dire scrutiny over the past decade and of course, it should be. And when I was a student, my safety was one of my greatest priorities but, some implemented rules under the guise of "safety" were and are... just plain ludicrous. Like who thinks up some of these ideas?

Redditor u/Animeking1108 wanted to discuss how the education system has ideas that sometimes are just more a pain in the butt than a daily enhancement... What was the dumbest rule your school enforced?
Keep reading... Show less
Image by Angelo Esslinger from Pixabay

One of the golden rules of life? Doctors are merely human. They don't know everything and they make mistakes. That is why you always want to get another opinion. Things are constantly missed. That doesn't mean docs don't know what they're doing, they just aren't infallible. So make sure to ask questions, lots of them.

Redditor u/Gorgon_the_Dragon wanted to hear from doctors about why it is imperative we always get second and maybe third opinions by asking... Doctors of Reddit, what was the worse thing you've seen for a patient that another Doctor overlooked?
Keep reading... Show less
Image by nonbirinonko from Pixabay

When we think about learning history, our first thought is usually sitting in our high school history class (or AP World History class if you're a nerd like me) being bored out of our minds. Unless again, you're a huge freaking nerd like me. But I think we all have the memory of the moment where we realized learning about history was kinda cool. And they usually start from one weird fact.

Here are a few examples of turning points in learning about history, straight from the keyboards of the people at AskReddit.

U/Tynoa2 asked: What's your favourite historical fact?


Keep reading... Show less