JOIN
OUR EMAIL LIST!

Hey Canada, 

It's coming up to your 150th Birthday this week. As a citizen of this beautiful country, there are a lot of things to celebrate. Your beautiful landscapes, bill C-16, and fairly great health care (er...I'll get to this later). 

But, Canada, I think we need to have a talk. There are a whole lot of things that I can't stop thinking about things that make it difficult for me to feel in a "party" mood. Things like our disproportionate suicide rates among Indigenous youth, or racial profiling, or our cruddy sex worker laws, to name a few. 

The historical moment we will commemorate on July 1st is the year of Confederation (1867) — "a bunch of old white guys signing a document that bound a loose collection of provinces controlled by the British Empire into a vague and discontented unity without the slightest consideration of or participation by the First Peoples."

Resistance 150, an indigenous political movement, is planning to disrupt the anniversary itself.

No matter how much Avril Lavigne I blast through my apartment, I can't help but feel a pit in my stomach about this whole Canada 150 thing. 

I know that it is hard to think about these things, especially when we are known for being polite and kindhearted. To look ourselves in the mirror and say, "crap, we've been doing this all wrong," is never an easy thing. 

But, Canada, I don't think I'm alone when I say that I wish this party was going a little bit differently. Instead of shouting our pride, I want to be the ones who lean over and listen to the quietest voice in the room. So, I've made a list of 37 things that I think we ought to be thinking about, talking about, prioritizing. 

This is going to be a tough conversation, Canada, but I hope it will be the beginning of something good. 



1. Canada 150 is a lie

Let's get this big thing out of the way. Canada 150 is catchy, sure, but it certainly doesn't do proper justice to our Indigenous population, who have called this land their home for 15,000+ years. 

The year we are celebrating, 1867, is the year of Confederation. The day that we are celebrating, July 1st, is the day when a bunch of white settler men signed a document that "bound a loose collection of provinces controlled by the British Empire into a vague and disconnected unity without the slightest consideration of or participation by the First Peoples. 

Since then, we have "celebrated" 150 years of cultural genocide aimed at our Indigenous populations. 



150 years ago, genocide. Not acknowledged. 

http://torontoist.com/2017/04/...

(http://www.cbc.ca/news/busines...)

(http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/...)

2. Support of cultural appropriation in the literary scene

https://www.thestar.com/news/g...

Something I'm proud of: Props to the crew that started the Indigenous writers award to counter the award.  http://www.cbc.ca/news/indigen...

3. People just can't seem to understand why uniformed police weren't welcome to march in Pride this year

http://www.knowable.com/a/reve...

4. Our corrupt correctional system. Prisons are the new residential schools

http://www.macleans.ca/news/ca...

5. Our drug problem 

Fentynal. Drugs treated like law, not mental health or recreational. 

https://www.theglobeandmail.co...

6. Our treatment of seniors

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/...

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/...

7. our prime ministers ability to charm his way out of responsibility by looking good

8. Racial profiling 

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/m...

9. Transphobia 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/opinion...

Something I'm proud of: The passing of bill ofidofj

10. Our improper way of addressing pedophilia 

https://www.thestar.com/news/i...

11. Food waste

http://www.cbc.ca/news/busines...

(we waste more food every year than is necessary to solve world hunger)

12. Homelessness

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/...

13. Our lassaiz-faire treatment of white collar crime is a testament to our privileging of certain classes of people

 (http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/...)

14. Cultural appropriation on the commercial level

https://thewalrus.ca/on-cultur...

15. Racism in our LGBTQ community

http://www.independent.co.uk/v...

16. The growing cost of post-secondary tuition and young adult debt

http://globalnews.ca/news/2924...

17. Home grown terrorism

18. The number of bankrupt Canadians is rising

http://globalnews.ca/news/3336...

19. Our sex worker laws are crud

 (http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/...)

20. There are over 50 endangered species in Canada

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Wildlife_Species_at_Risk_(Canada)

21.  Our foster care crisis 

https://www.theglobeandmail.co...

22. Gay men STILL can't donate blood 

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2...

23. A lack of diversity on board of directors (and in leadership in general)

https://www.boarddiversity.ca/...

24. We still have a wage gap ...and it's getting wider

https://www.theglobeandmail.co...

http://www.cbc.ca/news/busines...

25. Our health care that we're so proud of? It's not that great 

26. Suicide rates among Indigenous youth

(http://www.cbc.ca/news/opinion...) (http://www.cbc.ca/news2/intera...)

27. Mental health resources for university students

https://www.thestar.com/news/c...

http://www.macleans.ca/educati...

28. Our literacy and numeracy rates are nothing to be proud of

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2...

29. Even our best and brightest struggle to find work

http://www.macleans.ca/economy...

30. 4 of our major cities have dangerously high air pollution

http://www.besthealthmag.ca/be...

31. Toronto is having a housing crisis

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2...

32. We treat veteran PTSD as a joke

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/...

33. The church is still involved in major decisions about our country

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/d...

34. We're at a demographic tipping point

http://www.cbc.ca/news/busines...

35. Tampons and pads are still not government subsidized 

https://www.thestar.com/news/g...

36. Many Canadian towns still can't afford to have a recycling program. Most cities and towns don't have a green bin program

http://www.buschsystems.com/en...

37. The 13th month for Canadian refugees

http://www.macleans.ca/news/ca...

38. Our pipe line

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politic...

39. Xenophobia

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/m...

40. The pinkwashing of Pride 

http://canadianart.ca/features...

corporate opportunism at it's finest!

41. The way our courts handle sexual assault cases (and sexual assault survivors)

42. The exclusivity of academia 

43. 


Image by Mary Pahlke from Pixabay

There are few things more satisfying than a crisp $20 bill. Well, maybe a crisp $100 bill.

But twenty big ones can get you pretty far nonetheless.

Whether it's tucked firmly in a birthday card, passing from hand to hand after a knee-jerk sports bet, or going toward a useful tool, the old twenty dollar bill has been used for countless purposes.


Keep reading... Show less
Image by Jan Vašek from Pixabay

I realize that school safety has been severely compromised and has been under dire scrutiny over the past decade and of course, it should be. And when I was a student, my safety was one of my greatest priorities but, some implemented rules under the guise of "safety" were and are... just plain ludicrous. Like who thinks up some of these ideas?

Redditor u/Animeking1108 wanted to discuss how the education system has ideas that sometimes are just more a pain in the butt than a daily enhancement... What was the dumbest rule your school enforced?
Keep reading... Show less
Image by Angelo Esslinger from Pixabay

One of the golden rules of life? Doctors are merely human. They don't know everything and they make mistakes. That is why you always want to get another opinion. Things are constantly missed. That doesn't mean docs don't know what they're doing, they just aren't infallible. So make sure to ask questions, lots of them.

Redditor u/Gorgon_the_Dragon wanted to hear from doctors about why it is imperative we always get second and maybe third opinions by asking... Doctors of Reddit, what was the worse thing you've seen for a patient that another Doctor overlooked?
Keep reading... Show less
Image by nonbirinonko from Pixabay

When we think about learning history, our first thought is usually sitting in our high school history class (or AP World History class if you're a nerd like me) being bored out of our minds. Unless again, you're a huge freaking nerd like me. But I think we all have the memory of the moment where we realized learning about history was kinda cool. And they usually start from one weird fact.

Here are a few examples of turning points in learning about history, straight from the keyboards of the people at AskReddit.

U/Tynoa2 asked: What's your favourite historical fact?


Keep reading... Show less