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Fasten your seatbelts, Star Trek fans, because we just might be one step closer to having our very own replicators––right here on Earth!


In Star Trek lore, a replicator is a machine capable of creating (and recycling) objects. You can see one in action below, during an episode of Star Trek Enterprise.

Star Trek Replicator www.youtube.com

That's not to be confused with the food synthesizer seen on Star Trek: The Original Series, by the way.

Star Trek Replicator www.youtube.com

We might be one step closer to turning science fiction into reality thanks to a new development in 3D printing technology. Researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, have devised a new 3D printing process that doesn't necessarily "print" the object––instead, it pulls it from a gooey liquid that hardens when hit by a certain intensity of light.

The research, first published in Science, found that:

The liquid is poured into a transparent cylinder and placed in front of a projector. Using a 3D model of the object to be replicated, a computer tells the projector what patterns to beam onto the cylinder as the container rotates.

This process hardens specific areas of the gel, creating a rigid 3D shape within the liquid which can then be removed. The result is a smooth object with greater detail than you'd normally see from something produced by a 3D printer.

The researchers have nicknamed their new creation "the replicator" for its ability to create smooth, flexible objects––an upgrade from the typically rough, jagged objects seen in regular 3D printing.

"Basically, you've got an off-the-shelf video projector, which I literally brought in from home, and then you plug it into a laptop and use it to project a series of computed images, while a motor turns a cylinder that has a 3D-printing resin in it," Hayden Taylor, senior author of the research, said in a statement.

He added: "Obviously there are a lot of subtleties to it—how you formulate the resin, and, above all, how you compute the images that are going to be projected, but the barrier to creating a very simple version of this tool is not that high."

You can see it in action below:

Watch 3D printed objects appear in the middle of a gel www.youtube.com

People are intrigued, without a doubt:




We personally can't wait until we've taken ill and can watch a bowl of chicken noodle soup materialize before our eyes. The sky's the limit.

Image by Mary Pahlke from Pixabay

There are few things more satisfying than a crisp $20 bill. Well, maybe a crisp $100 bill.

But twenty big ones can get you pretty far nonetheless.

Whether it's tucked firmly in a birthday card, passing from hand to hand after a knee-jerk sports bet, or going toward a useful tool, the old twenty dollar bill has been used for countless purposes.


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Image by Jan Vašek from Pixabay

I realize that school safety has been severely compromised and has been under dire scrutiny over the past decade and of course, it should be. And when I was a student, my safety was one of my greatest priorities but, some implemented rules under the guise of "safety" were and are... just plain ludicrous. Like who thinks up some of these ideas?

Redditor u/Animeking1108 wanted to discuss how the education system has ideas that sometimes are just more a pain in the butt than a daily enhancement... What was the dumbest rule your school enforced?
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One of the golden rules of life? Doctors are merely human. They don't know everything and they make mistakes. That is why you always want to get another opinion. Things are constantly missed. That doesn't mean docs don't know what they're doing, they just aren't infallible. So make sure to ask questions, lots of them.

Redditor u/Gorgon_the_Dragon wanted to hear from doctors about why it is imperative we always get second and maybe third opinions by asking... Doctors of Reddit, what was the worse thing you've seen for a patient that another Doctor overlooked?
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When we think about learning history, our first thought is usually sitting in our high school history class (or AP World History class if you're a nerd like me) being bored out of our minds. Unless again, you're a huge freaking nerd like me. But I think we all have the memory of the moment where we realized learning about history was kinda cool. And they usually start from one weird fact.

Here are a few examples of turning points in learning about history, straight from the keyboards of the people at AskReddit.

U/Tynoa2 asked: What's your favourite historical fact?


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