Even though there have been significant strides in the LGBTQ community's fight for equality, not everyone is as accepting in 2019.

Bored Panda cited the sobering statistics from GLAAD's annual Accelerating Acceptance report which stated that Americans ages 18 to 34 who are comfortable interacting with LGBTQ members has declined from 63% in 2016 to 45% in 2018.


This is a devastating setback for those who struggle with coming out of the closet to family members.

The poll revealed that 36% of young men and women admitted they were uncomfortable with the discovery someone in their family is LGBTQ.

Millennials were generally assumed to be more open-minded than previous generations, but GLAAD's survey results reveal the momentum of LGBTQ acceptance is losing steam and, sadly, headed in reverse.

One story from 2013 about a grandfather's reaction to his daughter's dismissal of her gay son resurfaced online and still remains as relevant as ever.

The grandfather penned a hand-written letter addressing his daughter Christine who kicked her gay son Chad out of the house after he came out of the closet.

In the viral letter from six years ago, gramps admonished his callous daughter for kicking her gay son out and calling him an "abomination."


"Dear Christine: I'm disappointed in you as a daughter," he wrote.

"You're correct that we have shame in the family, but mistaken about what it is."
"Kicking Chad out of your home simply because he told you he was gay is the real 'abomination' here. A parent disowning her child is what goes 'against nature.'"
"The only intelligent thing I heard you saying in all this was that 'you didn't raise your son to be gay'. Of course you didn't. He was born this way and didn't choose it any more than he being left-handed. You, however, have made the choice of being hurtful, narrow-minded and backward."
"So, while we are in the business of disowning our children, I think I'll take this moment to say goodbye to you. I now have a fabulous (as the gay put it) grandson to raise and I don't have time for heartless B-word of a daughter."
"If you find your heart, give us a call."

Many praised Chad's strongest ally in the family.

"Mama got owned. Or rather, disowned." – Pastafarian
"How could anyone put anything ahead of their love for their child? Religion, sexual orientation, anything. There may be things you don't like about your child, but how could anything be so bad that you stop loving them? Even if he turned out to be a serial killer, I would still love him and try to get him the help he needs, and guide him through the punishment he deserves. But stop loving him? Never." – The_Original_Gronkie
"This kind of thing makes me want to puke. Kudos and many many congrats to the Grandfather for standing up for his Grandson. I applaud this thoroughly decent man." – mdmck1

Others were inspired to share their personal stories.


Bored Panda/Facebook


Bored Panda/Facebook


Bored Panda/Facebook



Bored Panda/Facebook


This Facebook user commiserated with their own story about being disowned.

Bored Panda/Facebook



Bored Panda/Facebook


Hopefully someday, Christine will see the light and show her son the love he deserves from his mother.


Bored Panda/Facebook

GLAAD President & CEO Sarah Kate Ellis admitted that LGBTQ acceptance has been taken for granted as the rise in non-LGBTQ Americans resisting acceptance has been negatively influenced by "divisive rhetoric in politics and culture."

One of the ways in which GLAAD is addressing the acceptance erosion – particularly from young men towards the LGBTQ community – is by launching a program to work with the video game industry to incorporate LGBTQ characters and story lines into games.

Ellis emphasized we cannot soley rely on legislation and judicial decisions for full acceptance of the LGBTQ Americans, but from "creating a culture where LGBTQ people are embraced and respected."

You can show your support with this shirt available here.

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Ellis added:

"This year's results demonstrate an urgent need for GLAAD to reach younger Americans with stories and campaigns that build acceptance."

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"Your smile isn't bright enough."

"I didn't feel appreciated."

"The color of your shirt is too loud."

"Your name is offensive."

Redditor InfiniteCalendar1 wanted to hear about some of the drama that's been thrown people's way, so they asked:

"What is the most ridiculous thing someone has filed a complaint against you or someone you know about?"
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Photo by That's Her Business on Unsplash

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