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Ulric Collette is a designer, graphic designer and photographer who has set out to show just how strong the bond of shared DNA is.


Collette lives in Quebec City and is a self-taught photographer. He is the artistic director for a Quebec City communication studio, Collette + Associés.

In a series titled "Genetic Portraits", Collette take photographs of two family members and puts them side-by-side.

By doing so,

"he brings to light the mysteries of genetic similarities or differences."

His goal is to highlight the

"paroxysm of similarities and genetic differences."

According to Bored Panda, the idea was born when he was photoshopping a picture of his own son.

"I started doing this genetic series in 2008 while doing a photo per day challenge. I had made a lot of self portraiture at the time, and made the first one of me and my 7 year old son a little bit by accident while trying something really different in photoshop."

He went on to further describe how his accident turned into a successful project and Instagram account.

"I published it on Flickr at the time and the response was great so I decided to try it out with other people, family and friends at first and so on… The project went viral a few time since then."
"I've made a few exhibits around the world, in Montreal, Belgium and the U.S. and featured in a few art books and magazines. I've also made the final at the Canne Lion in 2012 for a foundation project."
"My work is currently on display at the Transportation Mall Photography Exhibit at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta."

Here are some of the most powerful and fascinating images. Scroll through to see each side of the face individually.

"Son / Mother: Renaud, 17 & Madineg, 41, 2017"
"Daughter/Mother: Sophea, 37 & Sophal, 62, 2017"
"Sisters: Sam, 15 & Maxim, 16, 2016"
"Sisters: Élodie, 24 & Audrey, 30, 2014"
"Sisters: Véronique, 32 & Catherine, 26, 2014"
"Sister/Brother: Pascale, 45 & David, 36, 2013"
"Cousins: Ulric, 34 & Justine, 34, 2013"
"Grandmother/Granddaughter: Ginette, 61 & Ismaëlle, 12, 2013"
"Mother/Daughter: Janice, 57 & Marianne, 32, 2013"
"Sisters: Anne-Sophie, 19 & Pascale,16, 2011"
"Father/Son: Laval, 56 & Vincent, 29, 2009"

You can see more of Ulric Collette's "Genetic Portraits" series on Instagram.

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