June is a happy and exciting month for the LGBTQ+ community, being Pride Month.

Where people can proudly celebrate who they are and who they love.

And the crowds at these events seem to only grow bigger every year, as more and more LGBTQ+ allies also partake in the celebration.

Some of these allies might be late to the party, as it were, owing to the fact that they once held homophobic views, and only recently became more educated and changed their minds.

Redditor aestheticbear was curious what exactly it was that led former homophobes to change their previous views, leading them to ask:

"Former homophobic people of Reddit: what happened that made you stop being homophobic?"


It was what they were taught.

"Like many here, I grew up around people where homophobia was the norm."

"I come from a Latino, Mexican, background and I'm really ashamed of how much homophobia/hate in general there is in our culture."

"Since most Mexicans are Catholic, I grew up around the church a lot, especially since my father had once been a Catholic priest, long story."

"Growing up, and to this day, I was surrounded by lots of hate towards the LGTBQ+ community."

"My parents would often make remarks making queer people seem almost as if they were crazy."

"They would often say that they were crazy for wanting 'gay rights' and even saying 'yuck' if they saw a movie scene where 2 people of the same sex where kissing."

"As a kid, I was sort of brain washed into all of this."

"As I grew older, I learned more about the world around me especially learning from friends who had come out."

"I especially owe a lot to a teacher of mine who had opened my eyes up to many issues of our world."

"Now I'm a proud pansexual."- davvaz62

By simply getting to know them.

"I met some gay people."

"As it turns out they were just people"- moolord

By witnessing unjustified judgment.

"Not homophobic, but I woke up at about 10 when my mom said my uncle was banned from coming to our vacation condo by my father because he was gay."

"Before then I kind of let the arguments and both sides bit wash over me, but that was a crystallization point where I started noticing it as pure bigotry."

"I'm sorry the nicest dude in the family full of domestic violence and white collar drug abusers cant come to Christmas because he's gay?"

"You're both cheating on each other, sanctity of what marriage now?"- Robin_games

My mother knocked some sense into me

"My mom slapped me and told me everyone has a right to be happy."

"That was in 9th grade 13 years ago."- Bloodllust

Growing up

"Homophobia was the norm when I was growing up."

"Then I got older and the political landscape changed which made me question my belief and I came to the conclusion it just didn't make any sense to be homophobic."- LuciferIsFallen

"Realized that, fundamentally, being gay is just 'what' you are. It’s not 'who' you are."

Self-discovery

"I came out as gay."- pethal

"Stopped listening to my homophobic family and left their religion."

"Oh and also realized I myself was pretty gay."- Raidden

Just one moment of clarity

"I wasn't super homophobic, just a 'love the sinner, hate the sin' kind of guy."

"On my last day in high school, someone said 'Why do I care? They're not hurting me'."

"Cured me in three seconds."

"I still remember how magical that moment was for me."- Dirgonite

Re-evaluating religion

"There are 20 years between myself and my youngest brother."

"I, and my SO, was raised in an explicitly homophobic/biphobic/transphobic fundamentalist religion, that I left with my SO in my early 20s.

"So I had a lot of internalized, conditioned, toxic beliefs about the LGBTQ that needed to be deconstructed."

"My little brother was obviously either gay or bi and it was obvious from the time he was six imho."

"He came out to my sisters, SO, and I as bi when he was 11 and we were like 'tell us something we don't know lol'."

"I think watching him just grow up, it was obvious that he hadn't chosen to be that way, it was just how he was."

"This false narrative that LGBTQ are somehow defective or sinners became more disgusting to me over time."

"I can't remember exactly when it happened but my SO and I were like 'if our future child happened to be LGBTQ, could we teach that child the things we were taught about the LGBTQ?'"

"'We were like 'no, that would be evil'."

"Now, we have an 18yo niece that recently came out as lesbian and we feel honored to be the only family that she trusts enough to introduce to her first GF."

"Spending time with her just reaffirms the fact that there is nothing wrong with the LGBTQ, it was our upbringing that was defective."- Jormungandr91

It's amazing how so many ignorant people don't realize that all one needs to do to see a little more clearly is to open your eyes.

Here's hoping that they help others who remain as ignorant as they once were to open their eyes as well.

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