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If you can afford fine dining on a regular basis, that's great.

And while pandemic restrictions limit our posh dining opportunities, we can always be thankful for the simpler delights awaiting us in our home pantries.


I can't speak for everyone, but doesn't your palette sometimes prefer something less refined, like instant ramen?

Or how about that box of mac & cheese that comes with a packet of orange cheese powder?

They're cheap but are undeniably delicious, regardless of their lack of nutritional value.
Curious about other people's cheap meal cravings, Redditor laced-with-arsenic asked:
"What's your favorite poverty meal that you still eat regardless of where you are financially?"

Any of these on the menu sound familiar?

East Meets West

"Fried egg with rice."

eldritch_candy

"Good for breakfast, lunch or dinner."

elee0228

Hint: It Has Cheese

"Grill cheese sandwich"

GreenTeaDeluxe

"Grilled cheese is great pretending to be bougie food too. My brother and I used to go to the store together and splurge on fancy-ish cheese (i.e. still the precut stuff in plastic in the dairy section, not the high end stuff in the deli section or the fancy cheese cooler) and see who could come up with the best combination of cheeses and bread from the bakery section."

"I think we settled on sourdough, smoked gouda, havarti, and cream cheese."

The_Tic-Tac_Kid

All It's Kraft Up To Be

"Boxed mac is definitely my 'if you had to eat one food for the rest of your life' no-brainer."

upbeatish

Ramen Upgrade

"I'll one-up that with Indomie specifically. If you haven't heard of it, you're missing out."

"It was so popular in Nigeria it practically replaced the world 'noodle' (despite Indomie being an Indonesian product, 11,688 km away)."

"I brought it to an international summer camp in Finland where all the delegates from other countries pretty much lapped up the serving tray like dogs."

thebangzats

Spoiler Alert: It Involves Cinnamon, Sugar & Toast

"Cinnamon sugar toast"

squangee

"My 4 year old and I eat this for breakfast on the weekends. She calls it toast with sprinkles."

vintagchk

"Best cure for a sweet tooth! Reminds me of how my dad and I would hollow out strawberries and fill them with sugar when I was little, we called them sugar bombs!"

squangee

Good Morning Reaction GIF Giphy

Protein Cereal

"Hot dogs in baked beans."

timecronus

"Beanie weenies!"

Raemnant

"A gas station slushie mixed with gas station wine. Poor man's daiquiri."

r0f1m0us3

Always A Winning Combo

"Smashed potatoes with cheese. Was once my favorite poverty meal and now some kind of soulfood lol"

ezznezz

Culinary Expert–Approved

"I'm a chef. I own a restaurant. I've eaten some of the finest foods on this planet. Very few things taste better than box Mac and cheese with cut up hot dogs."

Sirnando138

Noah Centineo Chef GIF by Allure Giphy

Worth the Labor

"Pasta aglio olio. Warm some garlic in olive oil, add a sprinkle of red pepper and grate some parm on top. Love this simple, cheap classic."

leaky_eddie

Canned Delights

"Can of sweet corn, can of Ro-Tel (Chile's and tomatoes) mixed together."

alexmunse

Cheap AND Nutritious

"We used to eat squash and eggs growing up. Grew the squash and eggs are cheap enough, or trade with the neighbors. You just cut the squash into thin round and cook in a pan with a little oil until they're just soft. Scramble the eggs with the squash, add a bunch of pepper, some salt. Sometimes we ate it over noodles or rice."

_Not-A-Monkey-Slut_

Mom's Legacy

"Grew up poor, but my mom sure knew how to stretch a dollar. She would make steak fingers out of the cheapest cuts she could find. Tenderize, fry them up make gravy out of the drippings and serve with mashed potatoes. The whole meal probably cost less than 5 bucks in 70s dollars, and I'm telling you nothing tasted better. I made it for my kids when they were growing up and they still ask me for it sometimes. She would be 94 today."

"Love you miss you mom."

markarlage

Vegetarian Alternative

"I'm Mexican. For us, it's usually quesadillas without meat, rice and black beans as the sides."

LoneWolfTexan

SOS

"Sh*t on a shingle?" Sausage gravy served over toast."

phenomagasm

"I scrolled for 10 minutes to find somebody who also grew up with SOS. My mom made the gravy from scratch, just flour, butter, milk, and pepper, and used sliced corned beef instead. Mmmmmmm!!"

motherfuqueer

The Ingredient That's A Dish

"Dal. Aside from tumeric you can buy all the ingredients for less than $2 a pound."

Spam-Monkey

"Oh yeah! Dal is magic. Lentils in general deserve more love. They are SO GOOD FOR YOU, and are delicious. They make a great meat substitute if you're broke or just want to go meatless."

tomboyfancy

Just Add Rice

"Soup boiled down with rice to bulk it up."

StanMarsh02

"This is a good one, almost like a porridge or congee. When I'm sick I boil rice in chicken stock and just eat it that way, no soy sauce or anything else so its easy on my stomach. Its a really comforting thing to eat."

megaloduh

This Goes Down Easy

"Egg drop soup:

  • 1 quart chicken stock
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 tbsp corn starch
  • 1 inch grated ginger
  • whisk in 2 eggs
  • green onions sprinkled"

csaszarcasa

Image by Anemone123 from Pixabay

Life is hard. It's a miracle to make it through with some semblance of sanity. We are all plagued by grief and trauma. More and more people of all backgrounds are opening up about personal trauma and its origins. Finally! For far too long we've been too silent on this topic. And with so many people unable to afford mental health care, the outcomes can be damaging.

All of our childhoods have ups and downs and memories that can play out like nightmares. We carry that, or it follows us and the first step in recovery is talking about it. So who feels strong enough to speak?

Redditor u/nthn_thms wanted to see who was willing to share about things they'd probably rather forget, by asking:

What's the most traumatizing thing you experienced as a child?
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Image by klimkin from Pixabay

Being single can be fun. In fact, in this time of COVID, being single can save lives. But the heart is a fickle creature.

And being alone can really suck in times of turmoil. None of us are perfect and it feels like that's all anyone is looking for... perfect.

Now that doesn't mean that all of us are making it difficult to partner up. Sure, some people are too picky and mean-spirited, but some of the rest of us are crazy and too much to handle. So one has to be sure.

The truth is, being single is confusing, no matter how much we try to match. So let's try to understand...

Redditor u/Mcxyn wanted to discuss some truths about love and our own issues, by asking:

Why are you single?
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Tiard Schulz/Unsplash

Whether you're an at home parent, a college student just leaving the nest, or a Food Network junkie, there are a few basic tips that everyone should know.

Chef's gave us some of their top tips for amateurs and beginner at home cooks that will really make a difference. They are trained professionals with years of experience in the kitchen, so they definitely know what we're all missing.

If you're looking to improve some of your cooking skills and techniques, but you're still learning how to boil water correctly, this list is for you.

Redditor BigBadWolf44 wanted in on the secrets and asked:

"Chefs of Reddit, what's one rule of cooking amateurs need to know?"

Let's learn from the masters!


What a common mistake!

"A lot of the time when people add salt to a dish because they think it tastes flat, what it really needs is an acid like lemon juice or vinegar."

- Vexvertigo

"Instructions unclear I drugged my dinner party guests and now they're high on acid."

- itsyoboi_human

"Yes! Or tomatoes. They're pretty acidic too and go with so many things. Our dinners are so much better once the garden tomatoes are ripe. Or if a dish is too acidic, oil/butter or a little sugar can help add balance to it."

- darkhorse85

"Like tomato and eggs. Every Chinese mom makes those slightly differently and I haven't had a tomato egg dish I didn't like yet."

- random314

"There's a book called 'Salt Fat Acid Heat' that comes highly recommended to amateur cooks."

- Osolemia

"Reading even just the first chapter about salt made a lot of food I cooked immediately better, because I finally understood salt wasn't just that thing that sat on the dinner table that you applied after the meal was cooked."

- VaultBoy42

"Salt is important for sweets. A batch of cookies without that little hint of salt doesn't taste quite right."

- Osolemia

Unfortunately, this tip might not be accessible to everyone. Many people who contracted COVID can no longer use their sense of smell the way they used to.

"Have a friend that lost his smell from COVID, and now he only recognizes if food is salty, sweet, sour or bitter."

- AlphaLaufert99

"Just wait until he gets his sense of smell back and a ton of foods smell like ammonia or literal garbage now. Yeah, that's fun... It's been 7 months for f*cks sake just let me enjoy peanut butter again!!!!!!!!!"

- MirzaAbdullahKhan

You can't take back what you've already put in.

"You can always add, but you cannot take away."

- El_Duende666

"I find people's problems usually are they're too scared to add rather than they add too much."

- FreeReflection25

"I see you also grew up white in the mid-west."

- Snatch_Pastry

Safety first!

"Not really a cooking tip, but a law of the kitchen: A falling knife has no handle."

- wooddog

"I'm always so proud of my reflexes for not kicking in when I fumble a knife."

"If I drop anything else, my stupid hands are all over themselves trying to catch it (and often failing). But with a knife the hardwired automatic reaction is jump back immediately. Fingers out of the way, feet out of the way, everything out of the way. Good lookin out, cerebellum!"

- sonyka

"Speaking of KICKING in. On first full time cooking job I had a knife spin and fall off the counter. My (stupid) reflex was to put my foot under it like a damn hacky sack to keep it from hitting the ground. Went through the shoe, somehow between my toes, into the sole somehow without cutting me. Lessons learned: (1) let it fall; (2) never set a knife down close to the edge or with the handle sticking out; (3) hacky sack is not nearly as cool as it could be."

- AdjNounNumbers

"Similarly, NEVER put out a grease or oil fire with water. Smother with a lid or dump baking soda in there (do not use flour, as it can combust in the air making things worse)."

- Metallic_Substance

How else will you know it tastes good?

"Taste the food."

- OAKRAIDER64

"Also don't be afraid to poke and prod at it. I feel like people think the process is sacred and you can't shape/flip/feel/touch things while you cook them. The more you are hands on, the more control you have."

"No, this does not include situations where you are trying to sear something. Ever try flipping a chicken thigh early? That's how you rip a chunk out of it and leave it glued to the pan until it's burnt."

- Kryzm

Here's one just for laughs.

"When you grab a pair of tongs, click them a few times to make sure they are tongs."

- Kolshdaddy

"People really overlook this one. You've gotta tong the tongs a minimum of 3 times to make sure they tong, or else it can ruin the whole dish."

- BigTimeBobbyB

If you're looking to get into cooking or to improve you technique, pay attention to these few tips.

Salt generously, add an acid to brighten things up, and don't forget to taste your food!

If all else fails, you can always order take out.

Want to "know" more? Never miss another big, odd, funny, or heartbreaking moment again. Sign up for the Knowable newsletter here.

Victoria_Borodinova/Pixaba

As part of the learning process, children often do embarrassing things before they learn a little more about the world and all the different implications therein. While the inappropriate moment is usually minor and ends in laugher some instances are truly mortifying.

One such instance involved a little sister who was around 6 at the time. It was the 90s and at the height of the youth-focused PSAs (think the frying egg representing your brain). One type was a safety PSA about stranger danger. The speaker would remind the children that if a stranger tried to take you anywhere to yell “Stop, you're not my mommy/daddy" to raise the alarm.

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