Dead serious, one time I was in a cathedral in Spain, took a wrong turn, and ended up in some kitchen. There I saw the biggest pile of those communion wafer cracker things I had or will ever see. Was like Willy Wonka level Body of Christ output.


Historic buildings and museums are strange spots. They have an aura of significance, a dash of creepiness, there are most certainly ghosts kicking around in there, and the sometimes grouchy security staff does not really jive with the massive Renaissance paintings over their shoulders.

But if we can get back to that aura of significance piece, there must be some total gems in those walls. Old, secret, valuable gems.

u/xVeNoMiiZz asked, "People that work in famous/historical buildings around the world, what is the most interesting thing that the public doesn't get to see?"

An Underground Tower

I work for a company known for its cavern system and one of the coolest areas is a chamber that's a bit of a walk and about 15 feet further underground than the public gets to go. There's an absolutely huge, gorgeous column that's mostly white calcite, whereas most of the rest of our cavern formations are largely orange because iron oxide is a thing.

It's literally one of the tallest formations in the US but nobody ever gets to see it.

u/PuppetShowJustice

Location, Location, Location

Used to work on a very high floor in One World Trade Center (freedom tower) in NYC. You may or may not be surprised to hear that a large number of tenants are startups getting great deals on rent because people/companies are superstitious about the building and they've had a really hard time finding tenants. Also, it's so high you have to change elevators at the 64th floor to get to many of the offices.

u/steep4minutes

For that middle-of-the-2nd-movement poop

Some famous cathedrals have a bathroom secluded in the tall bell tower directly above the large organ in the rear.

It's not used by the public, but principally by the head verger and cathedral musician.

u/Back2Bach

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It Ain't Magic

To me it's just the shear amount of work/money that goes into preservation of a building over the course of decades. Often times a visitor will comment how "lucky" we are that a building has survived and is in good condition. And while I'm not discounting luck entirely, it really leaves out just how much people need to care for a building to be kept up and how expensive that can become.

u/WBStilwell

Take One Last Look, Kid

I worked at the Roosevelt Hotel in New Orleans, and there's a sealed-off presidential suite I'm certain is haunted. It's shown to staff during orientation, but oddly, rarely spoken of thereafter. It's very creepy.

u/hammetar

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Bird's Eye

The US capitol dome is actually hollow, there's an interstitial space between the outer layer and the older inner layer that was the original dome. Inside that space is a winding staircase that takes you up to the balcony, parapet that is right underneath that statue on the very top of the dome.

You need to be escorted up by a member of Congress or senator or if the house/senate is adjourned your chief of staff can take you up.

No elevator so many of the older members/chiefs just refuse to do it lmao. My photo up there is fire, great views of the national mall all the way out to the Washington monument and beyond.

u/T_1246

The Height of Luxury

On the top (50th) floor of the US Bank tower in Los Angeles is a toilet with a panoramic view looking toward Hollywood.

Source: was my boss's office. I took a couple dumps in it.

u/I0I0I0I

Pretty Exciting Entrance to Only Get the Snack Machine...

Beamish Museum in north east England is a living museum that has a recreation of a masons lodge from the 1910s. Knocking on a certain door three times gets you access to the modern staff area which lies underneath it. Have to think someone had a sense of humour for putting the staff room in that building!

u/emmach17

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No Wool At Work!

I had an office in the Burnham Center, one of the older historical skyscrapers in Chicago.

It was a static electricity nightmare. You could jump a static spark almost 5 inches off a filing cabinet. It was really bad in the winter.

u/scott60561

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Lest We Forget So Much History is Ugly

I am a curator at a government building. There is a very faint outline of the word "Colored" on the wall that you can't see unless you move so the light reflects just right. It's not something we point out on tours but those who know it's there know. It was where a water fountain used to be.

u/_saffronsick0_

The land Down Under is one of the most highly anticipated travel destinations for tourists around the world. Australia has fascinating history, beautiful sights, great food, cool wildlife, and some pretty cool people.

But as with any travel destination, there's bound to be a certain degree of culture shock. Have a seat and listen up, because you're in for some surprises.

Australians shared some information with us after Redditor emchmu123 asked the online community,

"Australians of Reddit, what is something that the rest of the world would be surprised or shocked to hear about the country?"
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One person's garbage is another's dream.

So who really knows what makes a bad movie?

I just know I've witnessed a ton of them.

To each their own I guess.

Redditor NuclearWinterGameswanted to compare notes on the worst cinema has to offer. They asked:

"What is hands down the worst movie you've ever watched?"
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People Describe The One Stranger They'll Never Forget
Photo by Deva Darshan on Unsplash

Life is really tough right now.

It's never been easy, but the world is such a disaster, it's really hard to have faith in humanity.

We need to help one another.

And often times the greatest help comes from a complete stranger.

We all leave an imprint on one another, good or bad.

Some leave a more permanent one than others.

Redditornyxflarewanted to talk about the people from our lives that left a lasting impression. They asked:

"Who is one stranger you still remember?"
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