Dead serious, one time I was in a cathedral in Spain, took a wrong turn, and ended up in some kitchen. There I saw the biggest pile of those communion wafer cracker things I had or will ever see. Was like Willy Wonka level Body of Christ output.


Historic buildings and museums are strange spots. They have an aura of significance, a dash of creepiness, there are most certainly ghosts kicking around in there, and the sometimes grouchy security staff does not really jive with the massive Renaissance paintings over their shoulders.

But if we can get back to that aura of significance piece, there must be some total gems in those walls. Old, secret, valuable gems.

u/xVeNoMiiZz asked, "People that work in famous/historical buildings around the world, what is the most interesting thing that the public doesn't get to see?"

An Underground Tower

I work for a company known for its cavern system and one of the coolest areas is a chamber that's a bit of a walk and about 15 feet further underground than the public gets to go. There's an absolutely huge, gorgeous column that's mostly white calcite, whereas most of the rest of our cavern formations are largely orange because iron oxide is a thing.

It's literally one of the tallest formations in the US but nobody ever gets to see it.

u/PuppetShowJustice

Location, Location, Location

Used to work on a very high floor in One World Trade Center (freedom tower) in NYC. You may or may not be surprised to hear that a large number of tenants are startups getting great deals on rent because people/companies are superstitious about the building and they've had a really hard time finding tenants. Also, it's so high you have to change elevators at the 64th floor to get to many of the offices.

u/steep4minutes

For that middle-of-the-2nd-movement poop

Some famous cathedrals have a bathroom secluded in the tall bell tower directly above the large organ in the rear.

It's not used by the public, but principally by the head verger and cathedral musician.

u/Back2Bach

Giphy

It Ain't Magic

To me it's just the shear amount of work/money that goes into preservation of a building over the course of decades. Often times a visitor will comment how "lucky" we are that a building has survived and is in good condition. And while I'm not discounting luck entirely, it really leaves out just how much people need to care for a building to be kept up and how expensive that can become.

u/WBStilwell

Take One Last Look, Kid

I worked at the Roosevelt Hotel in New Orleans, and there's a sealed-off presidential suite I'm certain is haunted. It's shown to staff during orientation, but oddly, rarely spoken of thereafter. It's very creepy.

u/hammetar

Giphy

Bird's Eye

The US capitol dome is actually hollow, there's an interstitial space between the outer layer and the older inner layer that was the original dome. Inside that space is a winding staircase that takes you up to the balcony, parapet that is right underneath that statue on the very top of the dome.

You need to be escorted up by a member of Congress or senator or if the house/senate is adjourned your chief of staff can take you up.

No elevator so many of the older members/chiefs just refuse to do it lmao. My photo up there is fire, great views of the national mall all the way out to the Washington monument and beyond.

u/T_1246

The Height of Luxury

On the top (50th) floor of the US Bank tower in Los Angeles is a toilet with a panoramic view looking toward Hollywood.

Source: was my boss's office. I took a couple dumps in it.

u/I0I0I0I

Pretty Exciting Entrance to Only Get the Snack Machine...

Beamish Museum in north east England is a living museum that has a recreation of a masons lodge from the 1910s. Knocking on a certain door three times gets you access to the modern staff area which lies underneath it. Have to think someone had a sense of humour for putting the staff room in that building!

u/emmach17

Giphy

No Wool At Work!

I had an office in the Burnham Center, one of the older historical skyscrapers in Chicago.

It was a static electricity nightmare. You could jump a static spark almost 5 inches off a filing cabinet. It was really bad in the winter.

u/scott60561

Giphy

Lest We Forget So Much History is Ugly

I am a curator at a government building. There is a very faint outline of the word "Colored" on the wall that you can't see unless you move so the light reflects just right. It's not something we point out on tours but those who know it's there know. It was where a water fountain used to be.

u/_saffronsick0_

You know, try as I might, I just can't bring myself to bother with The Walking Dead. I quit the show some years ago, probably around the time of that weird fakeout with Glen in the dumpster (and then his actual death right after that), but the truth is that the show was getting on my nerves for some time before that.

Did anyone actually care about all the nonsense going on with Deanna and the citizens of Alexandria? And can we go back a bit further and talk about how ludicrous Beth's death at the hands of some power-tripping officer in a hospital ward was? There was such a noticeable drop in quality after the third season that I questioned why I kept tuning in.

But this show is far from the only one to make people want to throw their remotes at their television screens. People shared their thoughts with us after Redditor regian24 asked the online community,

"What TV show was amazing at first but became unwatchable for you later on?"
Keep reading...Show less
People Break Down Which Professions Hollywood Gets Completely Wrong
Photo by Danial Igdery on Unsplash

More often than not, what gets us to keep tuning in to our favorite TV shows, or drawn to certain movies, is to get a glimpse into various professions which fascinate us, but which we wouldn't ever want to work ourselves.

Needless to say, there aren't many people who find the Indiana Jones films to be a remotely accurate depiction of archaeology, or that the Jurassic Park films show what paleontology is really like.

But many people tend to watch iconic procedurals like Grey's Anatomy and Law & Order under the notion that they both give an accurate depiction of the medical field and the legal world.

Only, how accurate are they?

Redditor Just_Surround_2108 was curious to learn which professions have been documented on screen without as much research as one might expect, leading them to ask:

"What profession does Hollywood get completely wrong in films and TV?"
Keep reading...Show less

Those who commute to work are always looking for ways to pass the time.

Many take it as an opportunity to catch up on their reading, or in this modern age, binge their favorite show on their laptop, tablet or phone.

Others, however, might make the time it takes them to get to and from work a little more practical, and either hone or learn a skill.

And while one can't master anything too complicated or difficult on the train or bus, there are some skills which can be practiced virtually any time, anywhere.

Redditor This_IsATroll was curious to hear from the Reddit community the ideal skills to fine tune on the way to work, leading them to ask:

"What's a silly little skill one can practice during the daily train commute?"
Keep reading...Show less

It feels like I scrub and scrub and scrub and still things are never fully clean.

I have no idea what spotless looks like.

Soap always leaves spots.

And as soon as you finish sweeping, there is more to sweep.

Tell me your secrets.

Redditorgossipchickenwanted to hear about all the best ways make things spic and span. They asked:

"Janitors/maids of Reddit. What are some neat cleaning tricks we can use?"
Keep reading...Show less