(Inside Edition/YouTube)

A Texas mother is reminding other parents to trust their parental instincts and be persistent when it comes to the health of their children.

"Keep looking and keep trying because you're usually right," said Meredith Motz, who didn't know her six-year-old son had been living his life with a tongue tie.




Mason Motz was born with a condition known as Sotos Syndrome, a genetic disorder "characterized by distinctive facial appearance, overgrowth in childhood and and learning disabilities or delayed development of mental and movement abilities," according to Genetics Home Reference.


Mason's parents were heartbroken over their son's struggles with his disorder.

"Sleeping was always stressful. He would stop breathing. He had trouble eating and swallowing; every single meal we would have to remove something that was choking him. He didn't get the nutrition he needed. His teeth started having problems."



But Mason's parents were especially concerned over his limited ability to speak.

He had been going to speech therapy since he was a one-year-old.





Finally, a trip to a dentist in Katy, Texas, revealed that Mason wasn't nonverbal at all.

Dr. Amy Luedemann-Lazar at Kidstown Dental made a discovery other dentists have missed.

She told Inside Edition, "We did detect a tongue-tie."

"Mason was not nonverbal; he was just unable to speak. He had been in speech therapy for years and no one had ever checked under his tongue."




Ankyloglossia, also known as tongue-tie, is a condition that restricts the tongue's range of motion affecting speech. The tight band of tissue, called the lingual frenulum, keeps the tip of the tongue tethered to the bottom of the mouth, preventing the afflicted person from sticking out their tongue or forming words to speak properly.

Luedemann-Lazar pointed out that ankyloglossia is a condition present at birth.

"When you're developing (in utero), your tongue is part of the floor of your mouth. A tongue-tie is an incomplete separation."

Meredith was surprised at the immediate result after doctors fixed Mason's Ankyloglossia through non-invasive Waterlase laser treatment.

"We took him home that evening and then he started talking about, 'I'm hungry,' 'I'm thirsty,' 'Can we watch a movie?,' like, blowing our minds with these full sentences for the first time within seven, eight hours of coming home. It was just shocking."



Mason no longer struggles with sleeping or choking during eating. He's still in speech therapy but is now able to communicate his feelings in full sentences.

"He really likes going to school," Meredith said. "He loves to dress up and he loves to dance. You can have conversations with him. He sings songs."

"He's always had so much to say, and now he's finally able to form the words."

You can watch Inside Edition's report in the YouTube clip below.




H/T - Mayoclinic, GHR, Twitter, InsideEdition,

Photo by Jens Lindner on Unsplash

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