D.C. Hospital Gives Emotional Honor Walk To Coast Guard Commander Who Donated Her Organs After Fatal Motorcycle Crash

D.C. Hospital Gives Emotional Honor Walk To Coast Guard Commander Who Donated Her Organs After Fatal Motorcycle Crash
ABC 7 News/YouTube

Officer and Commander Molly Waters was tragically killed in a motorcycle accident in Washington DC.


According to The Washington Post, the crash occurred about 5:20 a.m. Friday morning at South Capitol Street and Firth Sterling Avenue Southeast, when Waters' motorcycle was struck by a car.

Waters died of her injuries in the hospital later on.

Commander Waters then donated her organs and tissues posthumously.

The Coast Guard, on its Facebook page, called her "an inspiration to so many and friend to anyone she met."






Following her removal from life support, doctors and nurses from George Washington University Hospital held an honor walk for the fallen commander.

Coast Guard Commander Molly Waters Honor Walkwww.youtube.com


"She ended up passing life on to other people in need," her father said. "It helped give us a sense of closure."






"To see all of these people, it's like good Lord, our little kid. How far she went in life in her short 38 years," said Marian West, Molly's mother.

"In the passing, she wanted to donate all of her organs and tissues and anything she could. It's typical Molly fashion."

Waters served in the Coast Guard for 16 years, and leaves behind her cat, two sisters, mom and dad, and step-father.

RIP Molly.

Blue pointed signs that read, "Here, There, Everywhere"
Photo by Nick Fewings on Unsplash

In the midst of our shopping, we've all seen those warning labels on product packaging that leave us absolutely rolling our eyes. Who could possibly need to be warned about that?

But since the warning exists, we have to assume that someone made that mistake at some point.

There's the added fun of unnecessary products that no one should believe would work.

But just like the directions, there seems to be a marketable need for every product and direction.

Keep reading...Show less
People Share The Most Unsettling Facts About Themselves
Atharva Tulsi/Unsplash

CW: suicide.

Most people can be very guarded because of their vulnerabilities, even if you think you know them really well.

These disconcerting memories or character traits are better left undisclosed, for they can be painful for individuals to revisit or acknowledge.

On the other hand, opening up about these disturbing facts can also be therapeutic as long as they are revealed anonymously.

Keep reading...Show less

We never leave two movies feeling the same way.

In some cases, we are so moved by what we just saw, that we are sobbing so loudly, we're getting concerned looks from our fellow moviegoers.

In other cases, we waste no time in leaving, as we have just spent two hours or so of our lives we'll never get back again watching something which could have been made by second graders.

And then, there are the times when we leave the theatre, and all we can think is, "what the f*ck?"

Not necessarily because it was bad, but because we can't process exactly what we just saw.

It could be something we can appreciate more over time, with repeat viewings... how many views did it take you to fully understand Inception? Be honest!

Or, we are befuddled beyond words as to how such an inane, amateurish creation ever saw the light of day.

Keep reading...Show less

Franklin D. Roosevelt once famously said, "the only thing we have to fear is fear itself."

Words of encouragement to all Americans during his inaugural address, as America was in the midst of the great depression, with countless people having lost their jobs, their homes, and even their will to live.

While America did, indeed, bounce back, it hasn't stopped people from constantly living in fear.

Sadly, we're not talking about unfounded fears, such as ghosts or superstitions.

Unfortunately, there is plenty to be afraid of in this world, and horrifying evidence to prove it.

Keep reading...Show less