After rapper Mac Miller died on Friday, September 7, of an apparent drug overdose at the age of 26, many other rappers have been stepping forward to discourage children from doing drugs.

Many are even sharing personal anecdotes to try and convince their listeners that drugs have the ability to hurt you in potentially life-threatening ways.


On Monday, September 10, Bow Wow—stage name of Ohio native Shad Moss—took to Twitter to admit that, as a young star, he struggled with lean (cough syrup taken in excess of the recommended amounts, turning it into a recreational drug). He hoped to convince kids of the harmful effects by relaying how it led to some of the most unpleasant moments of his life.

The rap artist stated:

"To the youth- Stop with these dumb ass drugs. I'm going to let something out...."

Bow Wow then gave examples of different incidents where he was using lean.

Bow Wow said his behavior changed and drove people away.

"My attitude everything changed. My fans started to Turn on me my family too."


What seemed harmless at first quickly became far worse.

"I was addicted until our show in Cincinnati. i came off stg and passed out woke up in the hospital i was having withdrawals. I never felt a pain like that ever. It was summer but i was walking round with 3 hoodies on because i was so cold. I missed the chicago show of that tour baltimore show BECAUSE I WAS FUCKING HIGH AND SICK!!!!"


Now, Bow Wow is trying to make sure no other kids have to go through what he went through and how the affects last forever.

"I almost died fucking with syrup. To this day im affected my stomach will Never be the same and it hasn't been."




On Twitter, Bow Wow's followers thanked him for speaking out.




It's time our society makes some changes.



Now, thankfully, Bow Wow is doing much better!





Bow Wow is hoping all his fans will take his advice and stay away from drugs—they have taken friends of his and he never wants to see that again.




H/T - Complex, Oxygen

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash

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