Stuart C. Wilson/Getty Images

Hollywood has had its share of controversies, especially when it comes to gay actors losing out to roles doled out to their straight colleagues.

A Very English Scandal star Ben Whishaw, however, gave Tinseltown a free pass, but under one condition: that out LGBTQ actors are afforded similar opportunities as straight actors.


The Huffington Post reported how Whishaw– who also stars in Mary Poppins Returns as a grownup Michael Banks and a father of two children – disagreed with The Assassination Of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story actor Darren Criss turning down gay roles in the future to allow more job opportunities for LGBTQ actors.

A reporter asked if all actors should only accept roles that are limited to representing their authentic selves

On the contrary, Whishaw– who married Australian composer Mark Bradshaw in 2012 – believes that a skilled and credible actor can play any role, regardless of sexual identity or background.



"I really believe that actors can embody and portray anything and we shouldn't be defined only by what we are," said the 38-year-old actor.

"I think there was a time when we didn't know anything about actors, they were very mysterious. But now we know everything."

However, Whishaw added that the industry still has room for improvement when it comes to equal opportunities for actors.

"On the other hand, I think there needs to be greater equality. I would like to see more gay actors playing straight roles. It needs to be an even playing field for everybody that would be my ideal. I don't know how far we're away from that."




Fans praised the talented actor, who also voiced Paddington Bear from the eponymous movie.





On Sunday, Whishaw won a Golden Globe for his portrayal of Norman Scott – the former lover of Jeremy Thorpe, who led England's Liberal Party from 1967 to 1976, played by Hugh Grant in Amazon Prime's A Very English Scandal.







The Independent reported that a sequel to Mary Poppins Returns is being discussed due to its box office success; however, Whishaw said there should be a "long break" before any sequel is made.

You can watch the full backstage interview with Ben Whishaw following his 2019 Golden Globe win in the YouTube clip below.


Ben Whishaw - 2019 Golden Globes - Full Backstage Interview www.youtube.com

Congratulations on your victory, Ben! We will enjoy watching your brilliant versatility in any role, whether they are gay, straight, or even an adorable bear.

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash

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