One of the most exciting things parents share is working together to teach their child language. It turns out that, due to genetics and culture, mothers and fathers tend to impart very different skill sets to their children.


A team led by Menghan Zhang from the Laboratory of Contemporary Anthropology at the University of Fudan has just published a study that claims both parents pass on important aspects of language, which will later fit together like a puzzle to create a fluent understanding in the mind of their child.

The researchers studied "34 modern Indo-European populations," looking specifically at the links between linguistic entities like vocabulary or pronunciation and the genes passed down by both mothers and fathers. According to the results, Zheng and his team believe babies learn most of their vocabulary from their fathers, while they learn sounds and pronunciation from their mothers.



They drew this conclusion by showing that children who shared many similar genes with their fathers ended up with a similar lexicon of words, while there was also a strong correlation between a mother's genes and a child's phonetic skills.


This study flies in the face of two previously-held theories about which parent children acquire language from. Until the modern day, the "mother tongue" theory believed that mothers had the dominant role in shaping a child's native language. Then, in 1997, a study claimed just the opposite: that children learned how to speak from their fathers. This came to be known as the "father tongue theory."

In what some would describe as a fairly predictable turn of events, however, both of those theories would be put to rest by this new one: that both parents play an important role in shaping their child, though the child has a genetic predisposition to learn different things from each parent.

So don't feel bad, parents—you're both pulling your weight when it comes to teaching your baby to talk! You're a team, after all, and playing to each other's strengths is what being a team is all about.

H/T - Business Insider, National Science Review

Just because someone is popular doesn't mean they're nice or even sane.

We all learn that lesson the hard way. Everybody has their secrets, especially the people we think have it all.

School is a very emotional and frustrating time. And nobody truly knows how to properly deal.

The 'popular kids' are full of surprises.

So keep an eye on them.

And not for envy, for your own safety.

They're probably plotting something.

Keep reading... Show less
Christopher Ott on Unsplash

Everyone is on edge in this current climate.

And all it takes is one grievance committed by another to make a person snap.

Someone going postal could be the result of a significant other's infidelity, appalling customer service, or individuals on either side of an argument over abiding by certain health protocols.

And that changes day to day, or even by the hour.
Keep reading... Show less

I love to save money. And sometimes I tear up when I have to pay a bill that feels a little high.

I love to look at my bank account and watch the amount rise.

When it falls, I shudder.

So I will always look for a deal when shopping. Give me a clearance rack anytime.

But even in my delirium of thrift I can admit, that sometimes, there is an item or three where higher quality counts.

And higher quality often comes with a higher price tag.

So I spend what I have to... and then cry.

Keep reading... Show less