Nathan Congleton/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images, Andrew Lipovsky/NBC/NBCU Photobank, Theo Wargo/GettyImages for Tribeca Film Festival

The world may have lost the Queen of Soul, but she is far from forgotten.

Filmmaker Tyler Perry will be hosting a special concert paying tribute to Aretha Franklin with an impressive roster of guest artists who will be performing at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles.



"Aretha! A Grammy Celebration for the Queen of Soul" is set for taping on January 13, according to Variety, and will feature appearances by Yolanda Adams, Shirley Caesar, Alessia Cara, Kelly Clarkson, Common, Celine Dion, Jennifer Hudson, Alicia Keys, John Legend, Patti LaBelle, BeBe Winans, Brandi Carlile, Chloe X Halle, H.E.R., Janelle Monáe and SZA.





The tribute concert is a joint effort by CBS, the Recording Academy, AEG Ehrlich Ventures and music mogul Clive Davis to celebrate the R&B singer's legacy.



"Aretha Franklin's reign as the 'Queen of Soul' is incomparable and undisputed," praised Neil Portnow - President/CEO of the Recording Academy, according to The Root.

"For more than six decades, her extraordinary artistic achievements coupled with her passionate dedication to her philanthropic work—which ranged from children's and artists' issues to civil rights activism—served as a testament to her power, majesty and genius. These gifts positioned her as a true cultural icon, and the Recording Academy is honored to celebrate her inspirational legacy."



Co-producer of the concert Ken Ehrlich said the concert will highlight "the remarkable musical and cultural accomplishments of the Queen of Soul through her own words and music as well as through the performances of an amazing group of musical artists who will gather to celebrate her amazing musical heritage."

For Perry, taking on the role as the master of ceremonies is especially meaningful. Growing up, he was able to gauge his mother's mood based on which Aretha Franklin song she played.

And although Perry never actually met the singer, he received a surprise phone call from Franklin.

The legendary singer told him she loved Madea – a female character Perry played in a number of his films like Madea's Class Reunion (2003), and Madea's Family Reunion (2006).

"Well, you know she's not real, right?" he asked. Franklin responded, "I don't care. I want to talk to her."

And so she did. Caught in an impromptu moment, Perry channeled his alter ego and replied, "Hello."




Franklin died at 9:50 a.m. in her home on August 16, 2018, in Detroit surrounded by her friends and family.

Her oncologist, Dr. Philip Phillips of Karmanos Cancer Institute confirmed the cause of death was due to an advanced stage of pancreatic cancer of the neuroendocrine type. She was 76.

Clive Davis, who is serving as an executive producer for "Aretha!" expressed his joy in honoring his late friend with the forthcoming tribute.

"Aretha was more than the Queen of Soul; she was a national treasure. This unique concert— featuring many of today's greatest artists—will celebrate Aretha in a spectacular manner befitting her once-in-a-lifetime talent."

We can hardly wait to give our R-E-S-P-E-C-T come January 13, 2019.

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash

Some years ago, I had to advise a college friend to stop chasing the girl he was interested in at the time. She'd already turned him down. Explicitly. At least two or three times.

He wouldn't take no for an answer and didn't see anything wrong with his behavior.

Perhaps he'd seen too many movies where the guy eventually breaks through the girl's defenses and essentially coerces her into going out with him?

Keep reading... Show less
Caleb Woods/Unsplash

Parents make mistakes. We want to believe that parents are doing there very best to raise their kids, but sometimes they do more harm than good.

Research into childhood trauma didn't actually begin until the 1970s, so we don't have as much knowledge about our mental health as adults as we might like.

However, a study that followed 1,420 from 1992 to 2015 found conclusive results about childhood trauma:

"'It is a myth to believe that childhood trauma is a rare experience that only affects few,' the researchers say."
"Rather, their population sample suggests, 'it is a normative experience—it affects the majority of children at some point.'"
"A surprising 60 percent of those in the study were exposed to at least one trauma by age 16. Over 30 percent were exposed to multiple traumatic events."

Not all of the things our parents do that were not so helpful technically classify as trauma, but it definitely has an effect on us as we get older.

Keep reading... Show less
Ann on Unsplash

Breaking up is something that never gets easier.

Keep reading... Show less

On the outside, so many professions and careers look glamorous, financially enticing, and fun.

Often we sit back in our own lives and wallow in our dead-end jobs with that "wish I could do that for a living mentality!"

But if you look a little closer or, much like Dorothy Gale in OZ, just wait for a Toto to push the curtain back, you'll see that a lot more is going on behind the scenes.

And the shenanigans we don't see, make all that fun... evaporate.

So many careers and high power industries are built on a foundation of lies, backstabbing, and stress. And not in that fun "Dynasty" way.

That quiet, dead-end gig may not be so bad after all.

Redditor MethodicallyDeep wanted hear all the tea about certain careers, by asking:

What is a secret in your industry that should be talked about?
Keep reading... Show less