A Drunk Baggage Handler Passed Out In The Cargo Hold Of A Plane And Woke Up 500 Miles Later
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There's a reason why drinking on the job or before your shift is strictly forbidden. Intoxication not only impairs your ability to work efficiently, it can also lead to unexpected consequences – like being stranded in another city.

A Kansas City airline worker learned his lesson the hard way when he drank before reporting for his shift and passed out in the cargo of a Boeing 737.


The American subsidiary Piedmont Airlines employee had his sobering moment when he woke up in Chicago, 500 miles from where he decided to sleep on the job.


According to USA Today, the employee was working on the boarding ramp for American Flight 363 that was scheduled for a 5:52 a.m. flight on Saturday, October 27.

None of the employees noticed the missing baggage handler. The flight's crew took off, oblivious to their snoozing stowaway on board.

The flight landed at O'Hare International Airport and reached the gate by approximately 7:30 a.m., where he was discovered a few hours later.


The hungover employee, who remains anonymous, was interviewed by Chicago law enforcement and FBI.

He admitted he was inebriated and fell asleep in the cargo hold, according to Chicago Police Department spokesman Anthony Guglielmi.

No charges were made, but he was suspended from his job.

"The American team is very concerned about this serious situation, and we are reviewing what transpired with our Piedmont and Kansas City colleagues,'' American spokesman Ross Feinstein said in a statement.

Due to the heat and pressurized condition of the cargo hold, crew members were concerned about the wayward passenger's health. But the 23-year-old said he did not require any medical attention.

"We are grateful that he did not sustain any injuries,'' Feinstein said.

The jokes were rampant over the caper.








The setup was perfectly appropriate.


Could airlines be on board with this proposal?


The employee was promptly sent back to Kansas City on another American aircraft for his flight of shame, and this time, he was buckled up.

H/T - GettyImages, Twitter, USAtoday, Vice

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