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A World War II veteran asked for 100 cards for his 100th birthday, because, why not?

Celebrating one's centennial is quite an accomplishment, therefore he could ask for whatever he wants.


As it turns out, Joe Cuba's request had a global reach resulting in 10,000 birthday cards before his actual birthday on March 2.

It was more than he could ever hope for.

Cuba, who served in the United States Army Air Corps as a technical sergeant, was thrilled, according to BBC.

"I really didn't expect all the cards. I got a whole bunch of them - and I couldn't thank everyone enough."


The army veteran lives in Wichita Falls, Texas, at the Brookdale Midwestern Community.

The idea was suggested by its resident programs coordinator, Stephanie Veitenheimer.

She said:

"I asked Joe what he wanted for his birthday and he said, 'Nothing really, just happiness,' so I said, 'Well, why don't we get you 100 cards?'"

Veitenheimer posted a photo of Cuba holding a sign with the address that read:

"I'm a WW2 veteran who will be turning 100 on March 2, 2019. I would like to receive 100 birthday cards."


After the Facebook post was shared over 2,000 times, the cards began flooding in from all over the world, including places as far as Japan, Germany and Australia.

That's a lot of cards to open!



People posted a photo of the cards on social media before sending them out.

Here are some samples of what Cuba received in advance of his birthday.



This one came from the Netherlands, which reads:

"My card is ready for posting. Joe Cuba, here it comes."


People had fun showing their creative side with drawings as well.



This person illustrated an impressive caricature of Cuba and expressed their gratitude for his service.

This life-like portrait sent from Hungary almost looks like a photograph.



Brookdale Senior Living's Facebook page joked that it could take until Cuba's 101st birthday to get through all of his birthday greetings.

Cuba plans to spend his actual birth date with friends for a "dinner and a get-together."

While that alone sounds like the perfect present, those stacks of cards aren't so shabby, either.

Happy 100th, Joe!

We hope it's the best one yet!

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